Uma Naidoo, MD

Dr. Uma Naidoo is a nutritional psychiatrist and serves as the director of nutritional & lifestyle psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is on the faculty at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Naidoo trained at the Harvard Longwood Psychiatry Residency Training Program, and completed a consultation liaison fellowship at Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Naidoo studied nutrition, and she also graduated from the Cambridge School of Culinary Arts as a professional chef. She was awarded her culinary school’s most coveted award, the MFK Fisher Award for Innovation. Dr. Naidoo is regarded nationally and internationally as a pioneer in the field of nutritional psychiatry, having founded the first US hospital-based clinical service in this area. She is the author of the upcoming title, This is Your Brain on Food. With her passion for food and nutritional psychiatry, she will share her expertise on the integration of food, mental health, and medicine. https://umanaidoomd.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/umanaidoomd/


Posts by Uma Naidoo, MD

Gut feelings: How food affects your mood

Uma Naidoo, MD

Contributor

Besides causing inflammation and disease, more heavily processed foods can contribute to depression and anxiety through the connection between the gut and the brain. A healthier diet that favors whole foods over processed foods may offer protection against depression.

Eating well to help manage anxiety: Your questions answered

Uma Naidoo, MD

Contributor

Paying closer attention to diet is important for people with anxiety. Making dietary changes in favor of a balanced diet that emphasizes whole, unprocessed foods and minimizes added sugars helps smooth out the highs and lows that can contribute to anxiety.

Spice up your holidays with brain-healthy seasonings

Uma Naidoo, MD

Contributor

Spices and herbs have a long history as a safe component of human diets and traditional health practices. Aromatic ingredients that flavor our holiday meals also deliver antioxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, and other bioactive compounds that benefit the brain.

Sugar: Its many disguises

Uma Naidoo, MD

Contributor

Excess sugar in the diet can cause a whole host of health problems, both physical and mental. If you’re concerned about cutting down on sugar, you might think you’re covered if you skip the soda and pastries. But there are plenty of hidden and added sugars lurking in all kinds of foods — even those traditionally considered “healthy.” Here, we’ve given you some tips on what to watch out for.

Nutritional strategies to ease anxiety

Uma Naidoo, MD

Contributor

Millions of adults in the United States struggle with anxiety, but making the right dietary choices can help. The body’s slower metabolism of complex carbohydrates helps avoid drops in blood sugar, and foods with specific nutrients like zinc, magnesium, and antioxidant substances can ease anxiety as well.