Sara Fazio, MD, FACP

MD practices General Internal Medicine at the BIDMC, and is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. She received her undergraduate and medical degree from Brown University. After completing her internal medicine training at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, she was a chief resident at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and subsequently completed a Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education. She is the chair of the Board of Directors for the Alliance in Academic Internal Medicine. At Harvard, she is the Master of the Walter Bradford Cannon Society and the Associate Director of Innovation in Medical Education at the HMS Center for Primary Care. She directed the BIDMC Internal Medicine clerkship from 1999-2015 and was the CME Editor for the New England Journal of Medicine from 2011-2014. Dr. Fazio served as the SGIM (Society of General Internal Medicine) editor of the national CDIM (Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine)-SGIM Curriculum in Internal Medicine. She has received numerous teaching awards, including the Best Clinical Teacher Award from the classes of 2003, 2005 and 2007 at Harvard Medical School, the Faculty Prize for Excellence in Teaching, the Louis Pangaro Educational Program Development Award from CDIM, the S. Robert Stone Award for Excellence in Teaching at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and the SGIM National Award for Scholarship in Medical Education. Dr. Fazio is among a team of educators who were recently named winners of the second annual Costs of Care and American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation Teaching Value and Choosing Wisely Challenge.


Posts by Sara Fazio, MD, FACP

Untangling the non-invasive breast cancer controversy

Sara Fazio, MD, FACP
Sara Fazio, MD, FACP, Contributing Editor

Last month, JAMA Oncology published a study that suggests standard treatment for non-invasive breast cancer (DCIS) may be too aggressive and that perhaps some women with DCIS would do just as well without lumpectomy or mastectomy. As expected, this has generated a lot of controversy and confusion. For some women, DCIS is a “precursor” to invasive breast cancer, but in many others, it may not progress. But right now, doctors don’t understand these cancers well, and it is difficult to predict how these abnormal cells will behave in any given woman. More research is needed to determine optimal treatment for each individual woman diagnosed with DCIS. In the meantime, a woman with DCIS and her doctor should take into account certain risk factors (age and race among them), as well as that woman’s personal preferences when creating a treatment plan.