Wynne Armand, MD

Dr. Wynne Armand is an Associate Physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital where she provides primary care, and an Assistant Professor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Armand is also involved in teaching internal medicine residents in training. She is a faculty editor for MGH Primary Care Office InSite (PCOI), a website that provides patient information as well as guidelines for practicing physicians and healthcare staff. She is a medical director at ConsumerMedical, a company dedicated to educate and empower individuals in their healthcare decisions. Dr. Armand earned her medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine, where she also completed her internal medicine residency in a program dedicated to training physicians to become leaders in the care of the underserved.


Posts by Wynne Armand, MD

Travel tips: What you need to know before, during, and after you go abroad

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

Getting ready for a big trip abroad can be a lot of work, especially for people with health concerns. Some simple travel tips can help you plan ahead and take prudent precautions while away and help you avoid unexpected health issues.

Heat related illness: How to keep your cool

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

Prolonged periods of hot and humid weather increase the chance of a heat related illness, and you are at higher risk if you are older or spend time exerting yourself outdoors. Take precautions and be sure to hydrate wisely.

Keeping carbon monoxide out of your home

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

In the United States, around 400 people die each year from unintentional carbon monoxide exposure. It is so dangerous because it’s odorless and invisible, and is more likely to accumulate at high levels during the winter when homes are closed up.

Frozen (the cold will bother you…)

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

When it’s really cold and windy, frostbite can set in more quickly than you might think. But it’s also easy to take the right precautions to protect yourself and your family during outdoor activities this winter.

Ticks and the changing landscape of tick-borne illnesses

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

Ticks are being found in more places, and they are carrying newly discovered bacteria, meaning it’s more important than ever to protect yourself and your family when you are outdoors.

H. pylori, a true stomach “bug”: Who should doctors test and treat?

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

A stomach infection of H. pylori bacteria can cause ulcers, but not everyone with the infection shows symptoms and the treatment process can be challenging, so only people with certain conditions need to be tested for it.

Flu news: Now most people with egg allergies can get a flu shot

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

If you have been avoiding the flu shot because you’re allergic to eggs, studies suggest that you can safely get vaccinated. Allergic reactions to the flu shot are quite rare. If you’ve never had a reaction to a flu shot, protect yourself by getting one this year. Ideally do it in a doctor’s office or hospital so that you can get prompt treatment in the unlikely event you have an immediate, severe reaction.

Marijuana: Health effects of recreational and medical use

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

Regardless of whether or not marijuana is legal, using it can have long-term health effects, especially in those who are heavy users. Marijuana shows promise for treating certain medical conditions and symptoms, and further potential benefits are still being studied.

What’s the best way to quit smoking?

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

Quitting smoking can add years to your life. The earlier the better, but the benefits of quitting are real and significant, even if you’re 80. There are several ways to quit and it often takes multiple attempts to become and ex-smoker for good. Research suggests that for some people, quitting “cold turkey” may be the most effective approach.

Lung disease in smokers who don’t have COPD

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

You probably know that smoking has enormous consequences for your health. One of the most common is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a disorder involving damage to the lungs. If you smoke, but you don’t have COPD, you may be tempted to think your lungs are relatively unharmed — but a recent study suggests that some smokers without COPD might still suffer lung damage.