Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Monique Tello is a physician and writer. She is originally from the Boston area, and graduated from Brown University and the University of Vermont College of Medicine. She completed a combined internal medicine and pediatrics residency training program at Yale/New Haven Hospital, where she was very lucky to work with renowned medical writers Richard Selzer, Sherwin Nuland and Abraham Verghese, among others. After residency, she earned a Master's in Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Fellowship in General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital; her research and clinical focus while at Hopkins was HIV Women's Health. Throughout training and beyond, Monique has been active in international health, volunteering at and supporting clinics in Central and South America, as well as participating in several disaster missions. While living in Baltimore, she met her husband, local sports broadcaster Bob Socci, and they relocated to Milton, Massachusetts almost a decade ago. They have two young children, one with autism. She practices part-time internal medicine at Women's Health Associates, a small MGH-based primary care practice with all female providers that serves predominantly female patients. She is half Latina, speaks Spanish, and maintains a close relationship with her extended family in Guatemala. She writes a popular blog, www.generallymedicine.com, about her life as a doctor and a mother.


Posts by Monique Tello, MD, MPH

More evidence that exercise helps keep your brain fit

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

A review of dozens of studies on the benefits of exercise on cognitive health concluded that, for those over 50, just about any form of activity is beneficial if performed regularly.

Lifestyle change: “I know what to do, I just need to do it…but how?”

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

Despite willpower, many people find that making significant lifestyle changes is very difficult. Factors both internal and external influence our ability to make changes, but being aware of them is the first step to overcoming them.

Exercise versus caffeine: Which is your best ally to fight fatigue?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

When you need a boost, it’s tempting to reach for a cup of coffee or a soda, but studies show that even a short burst of physical activity will also provide a dose of energy, plus all the other benefits of exercise.

Eat only every other day and lose weight?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

Following an alternate-day fasting diet seems like it might be a good way to lose weight, but it’s difficult to stick to such an eating pattern because the cravings on fasting days can be uncomfortable, and research found that higher LDL cholesterol is a concern.

Run for your (long) life

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

A large, long-term study confirms that running decreases a person’s overall risk of death, and while the benefits from other forms of physical activity are not as significant, any activity is still better than none.

Over-the-counter pain relievers and your heart

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

As the evidence mounts linking use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with increased risk of heart failure or cardiac arrest, consumers need to be aware of the risks involved in taking these medications.

Taking medicines like you’re supposed to: Why is it so hard?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

Remembering to take medication regularly and consistently is a challenge. While various devices and strategies have been studied, sometimes the best approach is simply linking to another task that needs to be remembered.

A strengths-based approach to autism

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

Because children on the autism spectrum experience the world differently, some developmental experts advocate an approach to therapy that is based in an individual child’s interests, instead of trying to force a child to conform to established learning patterns.

If you have low back pain try these steps first

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

The American College of Physicians has released revised guidelines for the treatment of low back pain, and their recommendations for the most common types of pain do not include medications.These forms of low back pain usually get better over time and treatment should begin with therapies like heat and massage.

What’s the evidence for evidence-based medicine?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

The history of medicine is filled with remedies that were relied upon for hundreds of years until they were eventually proven ineffective or possibly even dangerous, while legitimate practices and treatments were disregarded or ridiculed until evidence outweighed skepticism. The bottom line is that medical interventions — from tests to treatments — should neither be recommended nor condemned without considering and weighing the evidence. A future post will discuss what physicians look for when evaluating “the evidence.”