Wendy Stead, MD

Dr. Wendy Stead is the program director of the BIDMC infectious diseases fellowship and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Stead received her BA from George Washington University and her MD from the University of Massachusetts. She completed her residency and chief residency in internal medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, followed by her fellowship in infectious diseases, and joined the BIDMC faculty with a joint appointment in the divisions of infectious diseases and general medicine and primary care in 2003. Her research interests include examining the effects of interspecialty education strategies on communication and collaboration between specialty services; developing resident and fellowship curricula in HIV, general infectious diseases, and trainee wellness; and communication skills in patients with opioid use disorders.


Posts by Wendy Stead, MD

Time for flu shots — getting one is more important than ever!

Wendy Stead, MD

Contributor

Getting a flu shot is important every year, but this winter there is added urgency due to the COVID-19 pandemic: with both diseases circulating, hospitals may face shortages of beds and equipment –– and it’s possible to have both the flu and COVID-19 at the same time.

Do adults really need tetanus booster shots?

Sara W. Dong, MD

Contributor
Wendy Stead, MD

Contributor

Can childhood tetanus vaccinations offer sufficient protection during adulthood without regular booster shots? Although a new study posits this, the CDC continues to recommend booster shots every 10 years.

No spleen? What you need to know to stay healthy

Wendy Stead, MD

Contributor

You don’t need your spleen to live a normal, healthy life, but the spleen does play an important role in defending the body against infection, so those without it need to take certain precautions to ensure they remain healthy.