Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD

Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, is Section Head of Vascular Medicine in the Cardiovascular Medicine Division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). He is Director of the BWH Thrombosis Research Group and serves as Principal Investigator of a broad range of randomized clinical trials and observational studies related to the prevention, treatment, and epidemiology of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Dr. Goldhaber serves as Chair of the Steering Committee of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored ATTRACT Trial of DVT, which is testing pharmacomechanical low-dose thrombolysis against standard anticoagulation to prevent postthrombotic syndrome. For his work on prevention of venous thromboembolism, Dr. Goldhaber has received the Certificate of Appreciation from the Surgeon General of the United States. In 2015, he received the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Heart Association. Dr. Goldhaber is President and Founding Director of the nonprofit organization, North American Thrombosis Forum (www.NATFonline.org). He serves as Section Editor of Clinician Update and the Cardiology Patient Page for Circulation. He runs a busy outpatient practice of general cardiology, venous thromboembolism, and atrial fibrillation patients, and oversees the inpatient Cardiology Consult Service.


Posts by Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD

Reversing the effects of the new anti-clotting drugs

Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD
Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD, Contibuting Editor

Anticoagulants — drugs that reduce the blood’s ability to clot — are used to treat clots in the lungs and legs and to prevent strokes in people with the heart rhythm abnormality called atrial fibrillation. The anticoagulant warfarin has been used for these purposes for many years. But it is difficult and time-consuming to find the optimal warfarin dose, and it carries a risk of difficult-to-control bleeding. Newer anticoagulants offer an easier and equally effective way to control the blood’s clotting ability, but until recently, there was no way to reverse the effects of these drugs if necessary. The approval of new antidotes to these newer anticoagulants will enable doctors to prescribe these drugs with increased confidence.