Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN FAHS is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School (HMS), and holds clinical positions at three HMS affiliated institutions. He serves as the Director of Continuing Medical Education at the Brigham & Women's Hospital, Department of Neurology, John R. Graham Headache Center. He is also a staff neurologist at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates/Atrius Health and the Cambridge Health Alliance. He completed his neurology residency at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, PA, and then completed a fellowship in headache medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. He is board certified in neurology and headache medicine. In addition to conventional headache treatments, Dr. Mathew performs Botox injections, trigger point injections, and nerve blocks.

In terms of his academic responsibilities, he has been involved in the training of neurology, psychiatry, internal medicine, family medicine, and dental residents, as well as two headache medicine fellows per year. Regarding medical student education, he is the founder and clerkship director of the Harvard Medical School Advanced Neurology Clerkship. He also serves on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School Cambridge Integrated Clerkship.

He has written multiple publications, and has presented at both national and international conferences. Dr. Mathew serves as a peer reviewer for multiple journals including Cephalalgia, Headache, Headache Currents, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Neurology, the British Medical Journal, and the New England Journal of Medicine. He is the Co-Chief Medical Editor of the journal Practical Neurology. He is a member of several medical societies including the Massachusetts Neurological Association, the American Academy of Neurology, the Headache Cooperative of New England, the American Headache Society, and the International Headache Society.

Dr. Mathew also applies his passion and expertise to the role of advocate for both patients and fellow physicians. He has participated in multiple successful lobbying efforts in Washington, DC headed by the American Academy of Neurology to improve patients’ access to healthcare. In March, 2015, Dr. Mathew was appointed as the neurology representative on the advisory board of the National Board of Physicians and Surgeons. The National Board of Physicians and Surgeons (www.NBPAS.org) is an organization committed to providing board re-certification that ensures physician compliance with national standards and lifelong learning after completing initial board certification with an American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) Board.


Posts by Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

A blog post on blog posts: Fact, fiction, and friction

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

Blogs can sometimes blend fact with opinion, so it’s important to know when a blog, even one written by a clinician, is an opinion. While clinicians operate with experience, some clinical advice can still spark healthy debate. And make sure the headlines you’re reading are not just sensationalized, which can easily happen in the non-medical media.

Acupuncture: A point in the right direction, or a stab in the dark?

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

Though some people surely benefit from acupuncture for the treatment of pain, its drawbacks (cost, length of treatment sessions, short duration of relief) mean that it may be a less effective choice than physical therapy or a medication.

How good is my doctor? Awards, acronyms, and anecdotes…Oh my

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

It’s already hard enough to pick the right doctor for yourself without all these awards and designations to pull apart. Which ones actually mean something and which ones don’t? These awards and the acronyms following a doctor’s name might be easier to interpret than you think. Just make sure not to judge a book by its cover – or a doctor by his or her labels.

White coat syndrome or white coat logo syndrome? The pitfalls of doctor shopping by “brand”

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

Branding has the power to influence people, but it should not necessarily be a significant, or the only, factor when it comes to health care. Picking a physician based on the name of their hospital does not always correlate with quality of care, and it could even cost you a larger copay.

Unlocking the lock jaw: Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) dysfunction

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

Most of us don’t appreciate the temporomandibular joint. It’s what lets us upon and close our mouths. Eating, chatting, yelling at a football game. Life just isn’t the same when there is a problem with this joint. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ) is painful and can worsen existing headache disorders. Learn more about TMJ, how to prevent it and how to treat it.

Snored to death: The symptoms and dangers of untreated sleep apnea

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

It’s important to get adequate sleep, but getting good quality sleep is just as important. Snoring can detract from a good night’s sleep whether you’re the snorer or the bed partner. Even more important, snoring can be a sign of sleep apnea. Untreated, sleep apnea increases our risk for serious health conditions including stroke and heart attack.

Lost in translation: Getting your doctor to be fluent in “patient”

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

Medical knowledge is growing at a rapid pace and technology is playing a larger role in medical practice. Office visits are becoming shorter in length and there is usually much to cover. That can make a doctor’s appointment challenging for both patient and physician. Strong communication is essential to help ensure that both patient and doctor make the best use of this time. Some simple steps can help you get the most from your time with your doctor and help ensure that you understand and can successfully act on his or her recommendations.

Spinning out of control: Vertigo

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

Vertigo occurs when the systems the body uses to maintain balance send contradictory information to the brain, causing a sensation of movement when you’re actually standing still. It’s very common for people to experience vertigo while on board boats. There are several medications that can ease the discomfort of vertigo.

Sinus headache or sign-us up for a migraine consultation

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

Because many of the symptoms are similar, many people who experience migraines mistakenly believe they have sinus headaches. An incorrect diagnosis can result in a person taking medications that may not help, as well as contributing to an inaccurate family history.

Movember: Stashing prostate and testicular cancer awareness into the limelight

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

The Movember movement began in 2003 to help raise awareness of prostate and testicular cancers as well as other health concerns including mental health issues. One of the primary goals of this initiative is to encourage men to take the time to pay attention to their health. This includes doing self-exams and getting the necessary screenings so that cancers can be detected and treated earlier.