Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD

Dr. Naomi Fisher is an endocrinologist at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She serves as Director of Hypertension Services at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, with both clinical and research expertise in cardiovascular endocrinology. Dr. Fisher received her medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She completed her residency in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and her fellowship in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is a veteran teacher, speaking on local, national and international levels. In addition to medical topics, she teaches about effective communication.


Posts by Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD

For the good of your heart: Keep holding the salt

Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD
Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD, Contributor

A recently published study claimed that people who ate a low sodium diet were more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease and death. However, there were problems with this study – including difficulty with accurately measuring each study volunteer’s daily intake of sodium. Low sodium diets may be harmful for small subsets of people, but for the majority of people restricting salt intake is still important for cardiovascular health.

Farewell to the fasting cholesterol test?

Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD
Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD, Contributor

If you’ve ever fasted overnight before having blood drawn, you know how uncomfortable and inconvenient this can be. But for many people, fasting blood draws might be a thing of the past. Recent guidelines reinforce that fasting is not required to have your cholesterol levels checked. This move, along with the advent of a non-fasting test to monitor diabetes, means you might not have to skip breakfast before your next visit to the doctor.

High blood pressure: Why me?

Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD
Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD, Contributor

It can be tough to accept a diagnosis of hypertension. It often causes no symptoms, and when doctors diagnose it, they often mention the consequences that may someday happen if it isn’t controlled. This can be a lot to take in if you’re feeling fine! Fortunately, hypertension is easily controlled — and staying on top of the treatment is the first step toward taming this “silent killer.”

Stress raising your blood pressure? Take a deep breath

Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD
Naomi D. L. Fisher, MD, Contributor

Stress is rampant these days, and repeated stresses can contribute to high blood pressure. Our bodies are primed to respond to stressors with an adrenaline-pumping “fight or flight” reaction that sends blood pressure soaring. Fortunately, we can learn to interrupt this automatic stress response — it’s as simple as taking a deep breath.