Nandini Mani, MD

Dr. Nandini Mani is a Hospitalist at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Mani is board-certified in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics. Her clinical interests include Hospital Quality Improvement, Healthcare Disparities, and International Health. She is dedicated to teaching both medical students and resident physicians in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, and has received an Ambulatory Teaching Award from the MGH Med-Peds residents. She earned her medical degree from the Penn State College of Medicine, and completed her Med-Peds residency at the University of Rochester.


Posts by Nandini Mani, MD

Exercise: Can a few minutes a day keep a hip fracture away?

Nandini Mani, MD
Nandini Mani, MD, Contributing Editor

As we age we lose bone strength, and the risk of a fracture becomes a serious concern. A study found that exercising for just a few minutes a day brought a reduction In risk for brittle bones.

Antibiotics don’t speed recovery from asthma attacks

Nandini Mani, MD
Nandini Mani, MD, Contributing Editor

Winter is often a tough season for asthma sufferers, who generally more likely to become sick than those without asthma. It’s important for asthma patients to receive proper care when ill, and a recent study sheds new light on a common treatment that might not be the best course of action for most asthmatics.

Activity tracker may not be the key to weight loss

Nandini Mani, MD
Nandini Mani, MD, Contributing Editor

A recent study found that using an activity tracker, in addition to a careful diet and increased exercise, may not help people lose weight or keep it off. The reasons why are unclear and further studies are needed to determine how, if at all, these devices might aid in weight loss.

Can exercise help relieve teen depression?

Nandini Mani, MD
Nandini Mani, MD, Contributing Editor

Depression isn’t confined to adulthood. One recent survey showed that nearly 11% of adolescents ages 12-17 were depressed. But one treatment commonly used to combat depression in adults may also be beneficial for adolescents who suffer from depression. According to a recent meta-analysis collected from rigorously evaluated studies, adolescents may experience improvement in their depression symptoms if they incorporate exercise into their treatment.

Would you know if your teen was depressed?

Nandini Mani, MD
Nandini Mani, MD, Contributing Editor

Recently, the USPSTF updated their guidelines for screening teenagers for depression. This update gives pediatricians — and all family care doctors — a framework for addressing this disorder. There are plenty of good reasons to screen teens for depression: it’s common among teenagers, it can look very different from depression in adults, and it can be dangerous to a teenager’s current — and future — health and happiness. Fortunately, there are a number of effective treatments available.

Anti-depressants for teens: A second look

Nandini Mani, MD
Nandini Mani, MD, Contributing Editor

Many parents of teens with depression worry that antidepressants could cause an increase in suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Previous research had suggested antidepressants are safe for teens. But recently, researchers have re-examined the original data and found antidepressants may not be as safe for teens as once thought. As always, whether to start an antidepressant depends heavily on your teen’s personal situation.

Teens with upbeat friends may have better emotional health

Nandini Mani, MD
Nandini Mani, MD, Contributing Editor

Generations of parents have worried about their kids having friends who are a “bad influence.” But what about friends who are a good influence? Recent research suggests that teens whose friends are emotionally healthy are less likely to suffer from depression, and that such friends can help improve the mood of teens who show signs of depression. This study is one of several in an emerging area of research on the relationship between our social networks and our health and well-being.

Overweight children are at risk for heart disease as adults

Nandini Mani, MD
Nandini Mani, MD, Contributing Editor

In a recent study of nearly 9,000 overweight and obese children and teens, doctors found that these young people had concerning blood pressure readings and worrisome cholesterol and blood sugar levels. In adults, such test results suggest a much higher risk for heart disease — so they are of particularly great concern in children. The good news is that with help and support, kids can lose weight — the results are a healthier, happier childhood and a greater chance of a healthier, longer adult life.