Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Monique Tello is a physician and writer. She is originally from the Boston area, and graduated from Brown University and the University of Vermont College of Medicine. She completed a combined internal medicine and pediatrics residency training program at Yale/New Haven Hospital, where she was very lucky to work with renowned medical writers Richard Selzer, Sherwin Nuland and Abraham Verghese, among others. After residency, she earned a Master's in Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Fellowship in General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital; her research and clinical focus while at Hopkins was HIV Women's Health. Throughout training and beyond, Monique has been active in international health, volunteering at and supporting clinics in Central and South America, as well as participating in several disaster missions. While living in Baltimore, she met her husband, local sports broadcaster Bob Socci, and they relocated to Milton, Massachusetts almost a decade ago. They have two young children, one with autism. She practices part-time internal medicine at Women's Health Associates, a small MGH-based primary care practice with all female providers that serves predominantly female patients. She is half Latina, speaks Spanish, and maintains a close relationship with her extended family in Guatemala. She writes a popular blog, www.generallymedicine.com, about her life as a doctor and a mother.


Posts by Monique Tello, MD, MPH

5 tips for the farmers market

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Shopping at a local farmers market can be a great way to add high-quality produce to your meals. But it’s easy to overspend at a farmers market, and some people don’t know what they should buy; following these tips will help you plan your visit.

What’s a healthy breakfast?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

It’s more than okay to skip the early-morning breakfast, but no matter what time of day you break your overnight fast, make your first meal a healthy one that won’t cause your blood sugar to spike.

Healthy lifestyle can prevent diabetes (and even reverse it)

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Twenty years of medical research confirms that it is possible to prevent diabetes through lifestyle changes such as eating a healthy diet and getting regular physical activity. For some people diabetes medications can also help, and in fact medication and lifestyle changes work especially well together.

Barbecue better for Labor Day

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Labor Day marks the unofficial end of summer, when many of us enjoy a long weekend with friends and family and toast the season with a backyard barbecue. The traditional meat-heavy barbecue menu can be hazardous to your health, but it doesn’t have to be. Some of the most popular barbecue foods are well-known to […]

Home cooking: Healthy family meals

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

When families eat dinner together, the benefits to children go beyond nutrition. Family meals can lead to improved academic performance and self-esteem. Involving the kids in preparing dinner also enriches the experience.

Home cooking: Good for your health

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Cooking at home is a great way to support healthier dietary choices; the next step, programs that provide instruction in cooking techniques, can help people understand what foods to choose at the store and how to prepare them, which can result in lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes.

Depression: Common medication side effect?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Many medications list depression or suicidal thoughts as a possible side effect, even those for unrelated conditions like high blood pressure or allergies. A recent study found that these side effects may be more prevalent than previously believed, particularly among those taking multiple medications with these side effects.

Healthy lifestyle: 5 keys to a longer life

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

You’ve probably heard it over and over, but research continues to show that following five simple healthy lifestyle habits makes a significant difference in life expectancy for both women and men, and the more of them you have, the longer you are likely to live.

Intermittent fasting: Surprising update

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

There is good evidence that intermittent fasting can be as effective for weight loss as simply eating less. But many people find it too hard to get through the fasting interval. New research suggests that eating only during a limited part of the day is more manageable and provides significant metabolic benefits.

Exercise as part of cancer treatment

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Based on analyses of multiple studies showing benefits of exercise, Australia’s national cancer organization has issued formal guidelines recommending exercise as part of cancer treatment for all cancer patients. The guidelines emphasize that exercise recommendations be tailored to each patient.