Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Monique Tello is a practicing physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, clinical instructor at Harvard Medical School, and author of Healthy Habits for Your Heart. She is originally from the Boston area, and graduated from Brown University and the University of Vermont College of Medicine. She completed a combined internal medicine and pediatrics residency training program at Yale/New Haven Hospital. After residency, she earned a Master's in Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Fellowship in General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Throughout training and beyond, Monique has been active in international health, volunteering at and supporting clinics in Central and South America, as well as participating in several disaster missions. She is half Latina, speaks Spanish, and maintains a close relationship with her extended family in Guatemala. She is married to local sports broadcaster Bob Socci, and they have two young children, one with autism. She writes a popular blog, www.generallymedicine.com, about achieving balance, health, and wellness from the perspective of doctor and mother.


Posts by Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Fiber-full eating for better health and lower cholesterol

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Most Americans don’t eat enough fiber, and many people say it’s because they are worried about eating too many carbs, but eating the right kind of carbs is what makes the difference, and it’s not that difficult to meet the recommended daily amount.

Brain health rests on heart health: Guidelines for lifestyle changes

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

The World Health Organization has issued prevention guidelines for preventing dementia. Of note, the guidelines are very similar to those for heart health, reinforcing the known connections between heart health and brain health.

Activity: It all counts

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

When it comes to physical activity and fitness, most of us could do more than we are doing, but the good news is that as long as you’re doing something, any amount of activity is beneficial, and more exercise is definitely associated with a lower risk of death.

Eating breakfast won’t help you lose weight, but skipping it might not either

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Eat breakfast? Skip breakfast? Newer research fails to link eating breakfast with eating less or weight loss. So, will skipping breakfast shave off weight?

Can you strong-arm diabetes?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Researchers exploring the relationship between diabetes and fitness found that a person’s level of strength did not match up with diabetes risk as predictably as they had expected, but the way a test measures strength may make a difference in the results.

Fat is more than calorie storage

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Researchers found that giving overweight mice a specific protein improved their metabolism, but point out that humans also produce this protein, and that exercise achieves the same result in people.

A positive mindset can help your heart

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Maintaining a positive outlook on life can help protect people from heart disease. Scientists believe that by doing this, such people avoid the damage to the cardiovascular system brought about by stress.

Going Mediterranean to prevent heart disease

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

A Mediterranean-style diet has been proven to reduce the risk of heart disease. In terms of healthy habits, it’s one of the best choices you can make, and adopting it into an everyday, real-life behavior is not as difficult as you might think.

Heart disease and breast cancer: Can women cut risk for both?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

While they share many risk factors, far more women are living with heart disease than with breast cancer. Exercise and a healthy diet can cut a woman’s risk for both.

Eat more plants, fewer animals

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Research has made it clear that eating a lot of red meat and processed meats increased the risk for heart disease and diabetes. A diet that is mainly plant-based is better for overall health, and it does not mean you have to give up meat entirely.