Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Monique Tello is a physician and writer. She is originally from the Boston area, and graduated from Brown University and the University of Vermont College of Medicine. She completed a combined internal medicine and pediatrics residency training program at Yale/New Haven Hospital, where she was very lucky to work with renowned medical writers Richard Selzer, Sherwin Nuland and Abraham Verghese, among others. After residency, she earned a Master's in Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Fellowship in General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital; her research and clinical focus while at Hopkins was HIV Women's Health. Throughout training and beyond, Monique has been active in international health, volunteering at and supporting clinics in Central and South America, as well as participating in several disaster missions. While living in Baltimore, she met her husband, local sports broadcaster Bob Socci, and they relocated to Milton, Massachusetts almost a decade ago. They have two young children, one with autism. She practices part-time internal medicine at Women's Health Associates, a small MGH-based primary care practice with all female providers that serves predominantly female patients. She is half Latina, speaks Spanish, and maintains a close relationship with her extended family in Guatemala. She writes a popular blog, www.generallymedicine.com, about her life as a doctor and a mother.


Posts by Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Screening mammograms: One recommendation may not fit all

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Research shows that the risk of breast cancer, and its severity, is greater for women of certain racial and ethnic backgrounds. These factors have not yet been included in formal guidelines for screening mammograms, but women need to be aware of them.

Which diet is best for long-term weight loss?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

A study comparing a low-fat diet and a low-carb diet found that weight loss for both groups were quite similar, and both led to significant health improvements for the participants. Diet for weight loss was part of a broader strategy of lifestyle change for both groups as well.

Trauma-informed care: What it is, and why it’s important

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Because medical exams are invasive, and because many people have experienced some form of trauma and may be uncomfortable with aspects of the exam, healthcare providers should approach care with consideration for what patients may have experienced.

Rethinking A1c goals for type 2 diabetes

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

New guidance from the American College of Physicians updates the approach to controlling blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, with more emphasis on finding an appropriate goal for each individual patient, rather than just working toward a number without regard for a patient’s needs.

Opioids in the household: “Sharing” pain pills is too common

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Many people have taken a friend’s or family member’s pain medication on occasion, but the ongoing opioid crisis has drawn attention to such behavior, forcing doctors, hospice workers, and other care providers to tighten their procedures and track quantities and dosages of pills more carefully.

What patients — and doctors — need to know about vitamins and supplements

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

While certain groups of people, and those who have certain conditions, can benefit from taking vitamins or supplements, most people will do better obtaining the nutrients they need from eating a health, balanced diet.

Diet and depression

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Research has shown that what we eat matters for every aspect of our health, including our mental health, and found that a healthy diet was associated with a significantly lower risk of developing symptoms of depression.

Calcium, vitamin D, and fractures (oh my!)

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

People over 50 who want to keep their bones healthy may be tempted to take calcium and/or vitamin D supplements, but recent research found that these are not likely to be effective; for most people, getting these nutrients from food is a better strategy.

Expert advice on how to quit smoking

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

People who are serious about quitting smoking want to know the most effective methods for doing so. For most people this is likely to be a combination of behavior strategies and medications, including nicotine replacement products that can be taken with other smoking cessation drugs.

Avoiding holiday excess (and what to do if you overdo it)

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

During the holiday season it’s easy to indulge in too much rich food or alcohol (or both), but some strategic planning ahead of your temptation-filled events can keep you feeling good. And if you’ve already had too much, there are things you can do to feel better quickly.