Matthew Solan

Matthew Solan is the executive editor of the Harvard Men's Health Watch. He previously served as executive editor for UCLA Health's Healthy Years and as a contributor to Duke Medicine's Health News and Weill Cornell Medical College's Women Nutrition Connection and Women's Health Advisor. Matthew's articles on medicine, exercise science, and nutrition, have appeared in Men's Health, Men's Fitness, Muscle & Fitness, Runner's World, and Yoga Journal. He earned a master of fine arts in writing from the University of San Francisco and a bachelor of science in journalism from the University of Florida.


Posts by Matthew Solan

We heard you — incontinence affects men too. Here’s what you need to know

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Urinary incontinence is more common in women, but men experience it too, particularly as they get older. Whether it’s urge incontinence or stress incontinence, there are strategies and treatments that can help.

The secret to happiness? Here’s some advice from the longest-running study on happiness

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

While it’s true that one’s inclination to happiness is partially inherited, an individual’s choices and behaviors also contribute significantly, and research has found that the happiest people all have certain traits in common.

Men (back) at work

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Because men bond through shared experiences such as work, recreating the dynamics of the workplace can help older men stay mentally sharp and socially active.

Can getting quality sleep help prevent Alzheimer’s disease?

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Sleep gives the brain the opportunity to rid itself of proteins believed to contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease, and now research is showing an association between poor sleep and the accumulation of those proteins.

Get SMART about your goals to stay focused and on track at any age

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

As we age our lives may not have the same focus or direction they did when we were younger. Maintaining goals is an excellent way to stay sharp and bring new focus to older age. The SMART approach ensures you’ve defined your goals clearly and can attain them.

Super-agers: This special group of older adults suggests you can keep your brain young and spry

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

While some people seem genetically predisposed to retain mental sharpness in old age, there are things anyone can do that can help maintain cognitive ability, or perhaps improve it.

Racket sports serve up health benefits

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Racket sports like tennis are beneficial to health, in part because of the types of movement required, and also because of the social component of playing with others. One of the fastest-growing racket sports particularly among older adults is “pickleball,” which blends tennis, table tennis, and the backyard childhood game of Wiffle ball.

Treadmills: Tips for using this versatile piece of exercise equipment

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

With the variety of speeds and inclines and the pre-programmed terrain patterns included, a treadmill is a flexible piece of exercise equipment that can provide a thorough and varied workout. Because you can control pace and intensity, treadmills are also a good option for people returning to activity following injury or surgery.

Don’t take fatigue lying down

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Everyone gets tired now and then, but when it happens too often, it may be time to take steps to address the problem. Some health conditions can contribute to fatigue, so it’s worth checking in with your doctor. And some simple lifestyle changes can help boost your energy in less serious cases of fatigue.

Sharpen your cooking skills and improve your diet (and even your social life)

Matthew Solan
Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Cooking more meals at home is a great way to have more healthy food choices in your diet, and learning skills and techniques will enhance the range of dishes you’ll be able to prepare (and may have other benefits as well). If you need some help with your kitchen skills, classes are usually available through community education centers, cooking schools, and some retail stores.