Kristina Liu, MD, MHS

Kristina Liu, MD, MHS, is a dermatologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where she serves as the director of the vitiligo clinic and director of dermatology simulation education. She received her medical degree and masters in health science from Yale School of Medicine, and completed her residency at the Harvard Combined Dermatology Program, where she served as chief resident. Her clinical and research interests include laser and cosmetic dermatology, pigmentary disorders of the skin, and medical education.


Posts by Kristina Liu, MD, MHS

A look at the effects of nail polish on nail health and safety

Different types of nail polish can have varying effects on fingernails, and have pros and cons depending on the chemicals used in making them.

Vitiligo: More than skin deep

Approximately 1% of the population has vitiligo, a skin condition in which areas of skin lose their color. While topical treatments and light therapy help some, research with a class of medications not previously used for this condition has shown promising results.

Adult acne: Understanding underlying causes and banishing breakouts

Just because you’re an adult doesn’t mean you are no longer susceptible to acne. Diet, medications, personal care products, stress, and a woman’s menstrual cycle can all contribute to acne production. Fortunately, there are many treatment options available.

Keep using sunscreen while FDA updates recommendations on safety of sunscreen ingredients

A recent study has left many people concerned about whether the sunscreen they use is safe, but until results of further testing are available, the protection offered by sunscreen outweighs any potential risk.

Dermal fillers: The good, the bad and the dangerous

As people get older, volume loss in the structural components of the face lead to many of the visual signs of aging. Dermal fillers, gel-like substances that are injected under the skin of the face, can help restore a more youthful appearance.

Topical treatment helps prevent actinic keratosis from developing into skin cancer

Actinic keratoses are scaly areas on the skin that, if left untreated, may develop into squamous cell skin cancers. A recent study compared several topical treatments used by dermatologists to treat this condition.

Banishing dry winter skin

Using a moisturizer is good for your skin year-round, but a dermatologist explains that during the cold and dry months there’s more you can do to prevent or relieve dry skin.

Can facial exercises reverse signs of aging?

A study found that a regimen of daily facial exercises led to fuller cheeks and a more youthful appearance among participants. But its small size makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the longevity of the results.