Julie Corliss

Julie Corliss is executive editor of the Harvard Heart Letter. Before  working at Harvard, she was a medical writer and editor at HealthNews, a consumer newsletter affiliated with The New England Journal of Medicine. She is co-author of Break Through Your Set Point: How to Finally Lose the Weight You Want and Keep it Off. Julie earned a B.A. in biology from Oberlin College and a master’s certificate in science communication from the University of California at Santa Cruz.


Posts by Julie Corliss

Losing weight: Mindfulness may help

Losing weight is inevitably a challenging experience, but using mindfulness techniques can help people understand the emotional motivations behind food cravings and learn how to cope with them.

Music and heart health

Almost everyone enjoys listening to music, but researchers are finding a connection between music and heart health. This isn’t limited to music therapy ans benefits may come from engaging with music in a variety of ways.

Heart attack versus cardiac arrest

Heart attack and cardiac arrest are different types of events, sometimes connected but often separate. Both are serious, but neither is necessarily fatal.

Overcome exercise excuses

Only slightly more than half of adults are getting the recommended amount of exercise. While some have pain or a chronic health condition, and others are just busy, it’s not difficult to add regular activity to your daily routine.

Is red wine actually good for your heart?

The belief that drinking red wine offers some degree of protection from heart disease has persisted for decades, but any evidence in support of this is just observational, without any scientific proof to back it up.

To exercise more, get your game on

Adding elements of competition and team involvement to fitness activities can make them more enjoyable, and can make people more likely to meet their exercise goals.

Fish oil capsules: Net benefits for the heart are limited

At one time there was hope that omega-3 supplements in the form of fish oil capsules might prevent heart disease, but 15 years of research has found this belief to be untrue, and taking fish oil could even be harmful to some people.

Taking an anticlotting drug? If you need a procedure, be prepared

People who take an anticlotting medication are at higher risk of bleeding if they need an invasive procedure, but stopping the drug ahead of a procedure carries its own risks.

Food trends through the years: A mixed bag for heart health?

The urge to follow food trends is strong, but eating a low-carb or gluten-free diet may not be the best choice for cardiovascular health. And while trans fat is on its way to being eliminated from packaged foods, we still eat too much sugar and salt.

Does drinking diet soda raise the risk of a stroke?

While a study suggests that people who drink a diet soda or more per day may be at higher risk for stroke, there are other factors that could account for these results. Regardless, it’s wise to limit any food with artificial sweetener.