Julie Corliss

Julie Corliss is executive editor of the Harvard Heart Letter. Before working at Harvard, she was a medical writer and editor at HealthNews, a consumer newsletter affiliated with The New England Journal of Medicine. She is co-author of Break Through Your Set Point: How to Finally Lose the Weight You Want and Keep it Off. Julie earned a BA in biology from Oberlin College and a master’s certificate in science communication from the University of California at Santa Cruz.


Posts by Julie Corliss

Could white-coat hypertension harm your heart?

People who have elevated blood pressure readings in a doctor’s office but normal readings elsewhere are said to have white-coat hypertension. A new study suggests that people with this condition face a greater risk of heart disease than those whose blood pressure is always normal.

Hands-only CPR: A lifesaving technique within your reach

For more than a decade, national guidelines have recommended the simpler, hands-only version of CPR for cardiac arrests that occur outside a hospital. Even if you haven’t had a training course, administering CPR keeps blood circulating in a cardiac arrest victim until medical help arrives.

Spring training: Moving from couch to 5K

Want to boost your activity level and your motivation? Consider a couch-to-5K program, which provides coaching to encourage walkers to transition to running.

Lead exposure and heart disease

The harm that lead can cause young children has been known for decades, but there is growing evidence that lead in the blood may raise the risk of heart disease in adults.

Planet-friendly, plant-based home cooking

The nutrition building blocks of plant-based meals are vegetables, whole grains, and legumes. These are easy to cook and relatively inexpensive, and people who prepare more meals at home tend to have better health profiles.

10 tricks to reduce salt (sodium) in your diet

Most people regularly exceed the recommended daily amount of sodium, but making some simple food substitutions in your regular eating habits can help you trim your salt intake.

Losing weight: Mindfulness may help

Losing weight is inevitably a challenging experience, but using mindfulness techniques can help people understand the emotional motivations behind food cravings and learn how to cope with them.

Music and heart health

Almost everyone enjoys listening to music, but researchers are finding a connection between music and heart health. This isn’t limited to music therapy ans benefits may come from engaging with music in a variety of ways.

Heart attack versus cardiac arrest

Heart attack and cardiac arrest are different types of events, sometimes connected but often separate. Both are serious, but neither is necessarily fatal.

Overcome exercise excuses

Only slightly more than half of adults are getting the recommended amount of exercise. While some have pain or a chronic health condition, and others are just busy, it’s not difficult to add regular activity to your daily routine.