Julie Corliss

Julie Corliss is executive editor of the Harvard Heart Letter. Before working at Harvard, she was a medical writer and editor at HealthNews, a consumer newsletter affiliated with The New England Journal of Medicine. She is co-author of Break Through Your Set Point: How to Finally Lose the Weight You Want and Keep it Off. Julie earned a BA in biology from Oberlin College and a master’s certificate in science communication from the University of California at Santa Cruz.


Posts by Julie Corliss

3 simple steps to jump-start your heart health this year

Several habits can improve your heart health (and, as a side effect, may make you less vulnerable to infections like the flu or COVID-19). Focusing on a few of these is an excellent way to take care of your heart — and boost your overall health in the process.

2 easy, affordable, plant-centered dinners

Shifting your diet to eat more plant-based foods and less meat and dairy products is a smart choice for your health, wallet, and the planet. These two easy, affordable and adaptable recipes are a good way to give plant-based eating a try.

How to recognize a ministroke or stroke — and what to do

A transient ischemic attack (TIA), or ministroke, is caused by a temporary lack of blood in part of the brain, usually from a clot. The fleeting symptoms of a TIA can be a warning of risk for an imminent, more serious stroke. In the event of a stroke, getting help immediately is crucial, and knowing the signs will make that more likely.

Staying positive during difficult times

The trials and challenges of this year are weighing heavily on many people, but attempting to employ positive psychology to put personal struggles in context, and accepting the ups and downs life brings, can ultimately increase positive feelings and provide perspective.

Worried about sleep apnea? Home-based testing is now the norm

Sleep apnea robs people of high-quality sleep, increases the risk of heart problems, and puts people at higher risk of accidents. While an overnight stay in a sleep lab used to be required to diagnose sleep apnea, now this testing often can be done at home.

Marijuana may be risky for your heart

Growing numbers of Americans are using some form of marijuana, including edibles and other products. But evidence is emerging that it can be harmful to the heart: it can cause a faster heartbeat and a rise in blood pressure, and chemicals in it can affect medications used to treat heart disease.

Home-cooked meals with less salt

Most Americans consume far too much sodium, which raises blood pressure and the risk of heart disease. Spending this extended period of time close to home is a good opportunity to work on cutting sodium from your diet by preparing low-salt meals.

Why the human heart thrives with exercise

A study comparing the hearts of apes with four different groups of men demonstrates how the heart adapts over a person’s lifetime depending on what exercise a person does (or doesn’t do). The most revealing part of the findings pertained to men who are generally not active.

Could white-coat hypertension harm your heart?

People who have elevated blood pressure readings in a doctor’s office but normal readings elsewhere are said to have white-coat hypertension. A new study suggests that people with this condition face a greater risk of heart disease than those whose blood pressure is always normal.

Hands-only CPR: A lifesaving technique within your reach

For more than a decade, national guidelines have recommended the simpler, hands-only version of CPR for cardiac arrests that occur outside a hospital. Even if you haven’t had a training course, administering CPR keeps blood circulating in a cardiac arrest victim until medical help arrives.