Daniel DeNoon

Daniel J. DeNoon is the former executive editor of the Harvard Heart Letter. He was senior medical writer for WebMD for 14 years. He was founding editor of the newsletter AIDSWeekly and covered the HIV/AIDS pandemic for this and other publications. DeNoon's work has won a number of journalism awards, including several of the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi awards. He has served as a board member of ServeHaiti, a nonprofit group bringing healthcare to a remote region of Haiti. DeNoon is a graduate of Emory University, where he received a BA in psychology and religion.


Posts by Daniel DeNoon

Combine brief bouts of moderate exercise for health

Daniel DeNoon
Daniel DeNoon, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

No time in your busy schedule for a long workout? No problem. Combining brief bouts (less than 10 minutes long) of moderate to vigorous exercise over the course of the day also add up to good health, an interesting new study suggests. The findings reinforce suggestions that people should look for simple ways to get short bouts of moderate to vigorous exercise: for example, by parking at the far end of the lot and walking briskly to the entrance, by taking the stairs quickly instead of riding the elevator, or by plugging in your earbuds and dancing energetically to a favorite song. If you are a professional working a desk job at a computer, set a timer and every half hour get up and do a minute or two of something energetic.

Back pain often overdiagnosed and overtreated

Daniel DeNoon
Daniel DeNoon, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

What doctors call “routine” back pain can really, really hurt. Surprisingly, the best treatment is usually quite conservative—over-the-counter pain relievers, ice and heat, and gentle exercise. Yet for decades, many doctors have been ordering more and more unnecessary tests, narcotics, and referrals to surgery. A new study of 24,000 people treated for back pain from 1999 through 2010 shows that many were not treated according to established guidelines, which promote treatment with over-the-counter pain relievers and physical therapy when appropriate, and advise against early referral for MRI or CT scans, the use of narcotics, or early referral to other physicians for injections or surgery. For a first-time bout with low back pain, or another go-round with it, try cold and heat, rest followed by gentle exercise, and over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or an NSAID like aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen.

Cities can learn lessons about diabetes from rural areas

Daniel DeNoon
Daniel DeNoon, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

City dwellers often think of rural America as a throwback to past “good old days.” But when it comes to obesity and diabetes, people living outside urban areas offer a frightening glimpse of the future. While more than 8% of Americans now have diabetes, in some rural counties 20% of the residents have diabetes. Those counties also tend to have high rates of obesity. Barriers to healthy living contribute to both obesity and diabetes. So does lack of primary care physicians. One answer may be greater reliance on community health workers—lay people trained to provide diabetes education and outreach. In Birmingham, Alabama, the Cities for Life program has doctors refer people with diabetes to “patient navigators” who help them find local resources such as nearby exercise classes or mobile farmers’ markets.

A dog could be your heart’s best friend

Daniel DeNoon
Daniel DeNoon, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

My twice-daily walks with my border collie, Clair DeNoon, are the highlights of my day. A new report from the American Heart Association will put an extra spring in my steps on these walks. A panel of experts from the American Heart Association has weighed all the available evidence on pet ownership and cardiovascular disease. The verdict: Having a pet—a dog in particular—likely lowers the risk of heart disease. Some of the connection can be attributed to the extra walks dog owners take. Companionship also contributes. If dog ownership is heart healthy, should everyone who cares about heart health have a dog? No. According to the heart association panel, “the primary purpose of adopting, rescuing, or purchasing a pet should not be to achieve a reduction in cardiovascular risk.”

Benefit to improving diet and exercise at the same time

Daniel DeNoon
Daniel DeNoon, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

When you decide it’s time to live a healthier lifestyle, you’re likely to get better long-term results if you start improving your diet and increasing physical activity at the same time. It may seem better to improve just one thing at a time.  But while you don’t have to make drastic changes overnight, a new […]