Arianne Shadi Kourosh, MD, MPH

Arianne Shadi Kourosh, MD, MPH, is a board certified dermatologist and Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Harvard Medical School. She is a graduate of the Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, where she was chosen by the faculty and her peers for awards in Leadership, Outstanding Professionalism and Humanism as a physician.

Dr. Kourosh is committed to patient advocacy and solving public health problems for patients with skin disease. She developed the Skin Advocate iPhone App, a free iPhone application that connects patients with patient advocacy organizations for their skin conditions. She has published and been recognized in the news and many publications, and served as Editor-in-Chief of Dialogues in Dermatology, the American Academy of Dermatology's official podcast and internationally subscribed educational program for physicians.

Dr. Kourosh serves as the Dermatology Department's Director of Community Health, increasing access to dermatologic care for underserved communities in the Boston area. She is the founding director of the Clinic for Pigmentary Disorders at Massachusetts General Hospital, and the founder and director of Project Phoenix, MGH's pro-bono tattoo removal program, assisting those seeking to escape gangs and human trafficking to be safe and reintegrate into society, which has won national awards for its impact. She also advocates for patients at the national level as the State Advocacy Leader for Massachusetts in the AAD's delegation to Congress to protect medical research and affordable care for patients with skin disease.

Dr. Kourosh has won numerous awards including Massachusetts General Hospital's Clinician-Teacher Award, Harvard Medical School's Dean's Community Service Award, and the Ernesto Gonzalez Award for outstanding service to the Latino Community. In 2020 she was named one of Medscape's 25 Rising Stars in Medicine.


Posts by Arianne Shadi Kourosh, MD, MPH

Acne: Considerations for darker skin

People with darker skin face particular challenges from acne. The release of melanin from skin inflammation can cause scarring or dark spots that can last for months or longer, and this is more likely to occur in people with darker skin. Treatment can help improve or prevent these conditions.