Heidi Godman

Heidi Godman is the executive editor of the Harvard Health Letter. Before coming to the Health Letter, she was an award-winning television news anchor and medical reporter for 25 years. Heidi is a journalism fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, and has been honored by the Associated Press, the American Heart Association, the Wellness Community, and other organizations for outstanding medical reporting. She is most proud of a government proclamation for her efforts to secure health insurance for less fortunate children. Heidi holds a bachelor of science degree in journalism from West Virginia University.


Posts by Heidi Godman

The whole grain goodness of modern and ancient grains

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Whole grains are important for a healthy, nutritious diet. Eating whole grain foods improve your cholesterol, and decrease your risk of drying from cardiovascular disease and cancer. There are different types of whole grains; modern grains are the grains we eat today like wheat, corn and rice, and ancient grains, which include grains like black rice, quinoa, and emmer. These foods are grown just as they were a thousand years ago. Although they offer different benefits, eating a variety of ancient and modern grains are important for a nutritious diet.

What to do when blood test results are not quite “normal”

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

If you’ve ever looked through your bloodwork results, you may have noticed that some of your results are barely within the normal range—or even just outside it. Many of these results simply reflect the fact that what’s perfectly normal for you doesn’t always fit within the laboratory’s “normal” range. It’s the trends in your results over time, not any one number, that tell the most accurate story about your health.

Pressed coffee is going mainstream — but should you drink it?

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Pressed coffee, once the darling of trendy coffee houses the world over, has broken out of its upscale origins and can now be found in kitchens all across America. Aficionados have been raving for years that pressed coffee tastes better than regular coffee — and they may be right. But it can potentially harm your health. Here, we’ve explored the health drawbacks — and benefits — that coffee has to offer, no matter the brewing style.

Medical alert systems: In vogue, and for some, invaluable

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Medical alert devices can be a lifesaver — literally — if you suffer a fall. But not all medical devices are created equal. Here, we’ve listed the most common types and described the pros and cons of each, as well as the important things to consider when deciding which type to purchase.

The latest ways to relieve the burden of decision-making at life’s end

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

A POLST order goes beyond what a DNR can cover: it allows you to set your preferences for treatments such as nutrition, pain medicine, and antibiotics at the end of life, and it applies both inside and outside the hospital. However, it’s not without its drawbacks. Ultimately, it’s safest to draw up not only a POLST, but other types of tried-and-true directives, to ensure you get the end-of-life care you want.

Retail health clinics: The pros and cons

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Retail health clinics are popping up everywhere, from drugstores and supermarkets to large retailers like Target and Walmart. Staffed by nurse practitioners or physician assistants, retail health clinics can be a great option, particularly if you’re younger and in generally good health. These clinics list their prices up-front and tend to be cheaper than a doctor’s visit. They’re convenient too: usually open extended hours, with no need for an appointment.

Nutrition shortcuts when you live alone

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Loneliness affects the dinner table. Whether it’s a busy, single professional, a college student, or an elderly adult, a person eating solo may wind up skipping meals or relying on convenience foods, such as cereal, frozen dinners, or canned foods. But healthy meals don’t need to be complicated or time-consuming. Sharing meals with friends and family on a regular basis is good for your health and well-being.

Challenge your mind and body to sharpen your thinking skills

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Mental and social engagement can help keep your brain sharp and lower the chances of cognitive decline, in part because challenging our brains may help forge new connections between brain cells. The key to taking advantage of the brain’s malleability is to find activities that you truly enjoy and to commit to life-long learning.

Healthy, convenient meals on the go: Yes, you can

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Today’s world runs at a hectic pace. To keep up, more and more people are turning to convenience foods — but many of these are high in calories, sugar, sodium, and unhealthy fats. The good news is that healthy convenience foods are out there, and you can find them if you’re willing to spend a few minutes reading ingredient labels. Other ideas for enjoying home-cooked meals in short order include using canned or frozen fruits, vegetables, or seafood in your next recipe, as well as planning meals ahead and cooking in batches.

Can digital fitness trackers get you moving?

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Study after study has shown that Americans don’t get enough activity. In fact, many of us don’t even get our recommended 10,000 steps a day. Could pedometers or digital fitness trackers help? Pedometers are simple gadgets that measure how many steps you take. Digital fitness trackers also measure the pace, distance, duration, and intensity of your activity, and often have accompanying web applications that can evaluate and even graph this information. In a small study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers gave either a standard pedometer or a Fitbit brand digital fitness tracker to 51 overweight postmenopausal women who had been getting about 33 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous physical activity. The pedometer group did not have any significant change to their activity levels. But the fitness tracker group increased their physical activity by an additional 38 minutes per week.