Heidi Godman

Heidi Godman is the executive editor of the Harvard Health Letter. Before coming to the Health Letter, she was an award-winning television news anchor and medical reporter for 25 years. Heidi was named a journalism fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, and has been honored by the Associated Press, the American Heart Association, the Wellness Community, and other organizations for outstanding medical reporting. Heidi holds a bachelor of science degree in journalism from West Virginia University.


Posts by Heidi Godman

The fix for dry eyes

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

As we age our eyes become susceptible to dryness due to decreased tear production or slowing glands. Other conditions can contribute to dry eye syndrome as well, including looking at the screen of a computer, phone, or tablet for too long. There are a number of simple treatments that can bring relief and prevent infection and other problems.

A healthy lifestyle may help you sidestep Alzheimer’s

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

By now it’s evident that healthy lifestyle habits have clear benefits, and evidence suggests that keeping Alzheimer’s disease at bay may eventually be added to the list. Data are strongest for regular exercise, a Mediterranean diet, and sufficient sleep as important ways to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s. Other lifestyle choices may help as well.

How much artificial trans fat is still in our food?

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Although the FDA has mandated that trans fats must be removed from processed foods in 2018, many products still contain the fats. Because small amounts are not required to be listed on the Nutrition Facts label, consumers must read ingredient lists to find these fats. The trick to finding trans fats: read the ingredient lists on Nutrition Facts labels. If partially hydrogenated oil is among the ingredients, you’ll know the food contains trans fat, even if the label states that a serving has zero grams of trans fat.

Hot soup in a hurry

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Making your own soup is easier than you may think, and it’s certainly healthier than buying prepared soup from a restaurant or market. prepared soups often have too much fat and salt; by making it yourself, you can load it up with healthy vegetables. Add protein such as lentils or beans, fish, or extra-lean beef, turkey, or chicken for a complete meal.

Your best cycling days may still be ahead

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

I loved riding my bicycle as a kid, and whizzing along wooded roads with friends on crisp autumn days. For me, the images of blurred leaves and sunshine are still fresh, as are the feelings of freedom, joy, and the wind on my skin. Now, only an occasional bike ride with my children reminds me […]

Need an appointment right away? Consider a virtual doctor visit

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

The availability of virtual doctor visits via computer or mobile device offers consumers the convenience of a remote consultation at any time, and at a reasonable cost, with the caveat that certain types of medical issues require an in-person visit. Virtual visits aren’t meant to replace every trip to the doctor’s office, but may be a good option for minor, temporary problems.

Beating osteoarthritis knee pain: Beyond special shoes

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

For people suffering from knee osteoarthritis, one long-standing solution to knee pain was the use of “unloading” shoes. These shoes use stiffer soles and slightly tilted insoles that help to reposition the foot and ‘unload,’ or decrease, the pain on the knee. But a new study revealed that these shoes might not be any better than good walking shoes at relieving pain from knee osteoarthritis.

The whole grain goodness of modern and ancient grains

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Whole grains are important for a healthy, nutritious diet. Eating whole grain foods improve your cholesterol, and decrease your risk of drying from cardiovascular disease and cancer. There are different types of whole grains; modern grains are the grains we eat today like wheat, corn and rice, and ancient grains, which include grains like black rice, quinoa, and emmer. These foods are grown just as they were a thousand years ago. Although they offer different benefits, eating a variety of ancient and modern grains are important for a nutritious diet.

What to do when blood test results are not quite “normal”

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

If you’ve ever looked through your bloodwork results, you may have noticed that some of your results are barely within the normal range—or even just outside it. Many of these results simply reflect the fact that what’s perfectly normal for you doesn’t always fit within the laboratory’s “normal” range. It’s the trends in your results over time, not any one number, that tell the most accurate story about your health.

Pressed coffee is going mainstream — but should you drink it?

Heidi Godman
Heidi Godman, Executive Editor, Harvard Health Letter

Pressed coffee, once the darling of trendy coffee houses the world over, has broken out of its upscale origins and can now be found in kitchens all across America. Aficionados have been raving for years that pressed coffee tastes better than regular coffee — and they may be right. But it can potentially harm your health. Here, we’ve explored the health drawbacks — and benefits — that coffee has to offer, no matter the brewing style.