Bladder & Bowel

Bladder & Bowel Articles

Keep your digestion moving

Over time, everyone’s digestive system works less efficiently and people can develop food intolerance or begin taking medications that can affect digestion. These changes can create problems like gas, bloating, cramps, and constipation. By identifying the reasons for the digestive issues, managing them becomes easier and can help keep the entire system running smoothly. (Locked) More »

What’s causing bladder pain or burning?

Bladder pain and burning with urination affect more women than men. The symptoms can be caused by many conditions, such as upper or lower urinary tract infections, genitourinary syndrome of menopause, vaginitis, sexually transmitted infections, and interstitial cystitis (bladder pain syndrome). When symptoms occur, one should see a primary care doctor or gynecologist, and possibly a urologist or urogynecologist. Depending on the condition, treatment can include the use of antibiotics, vaginal estrogen cream, or bladder training. (Locked) More »

Is bladder training really beneficial?

Bladder training is a strategy that people suffering from urinary frequency or overactive bladder might try to improve their condition. It involves urinating on a schedule, gradually extending the time between bathroom visits, to improve bladder function. More »

How can I prevent recurrent UTIs?

Preventing frequent urinary tract infections can become more challenging as women age, but drinking lots of water and practicing good hygiene can help prevent them. (Locked) More »

Pill-free treatment for urinary incontinence

A study published online March 18, 2019, by Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that behavioral therapy is more effective than medication or neuromodulation for stress incontinence and urge incontinence. More »

Tips for better bowel control

Stool can leak out of the rectum accidentally—a condition called fecal incontinence—as a result of aging, an underlying condition, or damage to nerves or muscles. A fiber supplement such as Metamucil or Citrucel can help reduce incidents of loose stool leakage. An over-the-counter antidiarrheal medication such as loperamide (Imodium) can also help. A surgical procedure called sacral nerve stimulation can help curb solid stool incontinence. Pelvic floor exercises can also help reduce leakages, but won’t solve the problem. More »

Why do I get weak after a bowel movement?

Bowel movements can slow heart rate and lower blood pressure, which can make a person feel weak. This often is not a serious problem, and lying down for a few minutes can make the feeling go away. More »

The growing problem of an enlarged prostate gland

By age 60, about half of all men will have an enlarged prostate. While the condition does not increase the risk of getting prostate cancer or having sexual problems, it can affect quality of life, specifically with annoying and embarrassing urination problems. Certain medications can help relieve symptoms, which means less urinary urgency and fewer nighttime awakenings to use the bathroom. More »