Harvard Health Blog

Join the discussion with experts from Harvard Health Publishing and others like you on a variety of health topics, medical news and views.

Reducing your risk of changes in thinking following surgery

As more older people undergo surgeries, the risk of complications increases, including for cognitive decline following their procedures, particularly after cardiac surgery. But awareness and pre-planning with your care team can help you avoid such complications.

Are there benefits of cardiac catheterization for stable coronary artery disease?

In patients with acute coronary syndrome, studies have shown that cardiac catheterization can decrease heart attacks and improve survival. A recent study attempted to determine if the procedure would have comparable results in people with a more stable form of coronary artery disease.

Some healthcare can safely wait (and some can’t)

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Some routine or elective healthcare can safely wait a while, but putting off medical care for certain health conditions or potentially serious problems is risky.

How to respond to tantrums

Children’s tantrums always seem to happen at the worst possible times. Take a breath and try this 3-point strategy for calming everyone down.

I have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). What should I eat?

John Garber, MD

Contributor

For people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), knowing which foods to eat and which to avoid is important information. An international organization has developed guidelines for some kinds of food, with the aim of helping people with this condition reduce symptoms and inflammation.

And now for some good news on health

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Good news on health –– which seems hard to come by right now –– includes declines in the rates of six out of 10 major causes of death in the United States.

New warning on coronavirus symptoms in children — what parents need to know

Claire McCarthy, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

A rare syndrome in some children that affects the heart and other organs may be a reaction to a current or past COVID-19 infection, but test results for the coronavirus are sometimes negative.

SMall Incision Lenticule Extraction (SMILE): It’s what’s new in laser vision correction

Different types of laser vision correction procedures have been available since the mid-1990s, but the newest development, small incision lenticule extraction, combines the advantages of the other variations while offering a comfortable procedure with a quick recovery.

Why your sleep and wake cycles affect your mood

The body’s circadian rhythm controls our sleep-wake cycle, so an irregular rhythm can negatively affect sleep and proper functioning, which can lead to health problems including mood disorders. The tendency to rise early or stay up late is genetically determined, but you may be able to adjust your life to better match your circadian rhythm.

Do adults really need tetanus booster shots?

Sara W. Dong, MD

Contributor
Wendy Stead, MD

Contributor

Can childhood tetanus vaccinations offer sufficient protection during adulthood without regular booster shots? Although a new study posits this, the CDC continues to recommend booster shots every 10 years.