Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

Should you take a daily erectile dysfunction pill?

Tadalafil (Cialis) is one of the most popular erectile dysfunction (ED) drugs. Its major appeal? The drug comes in low-dose versions that can be taken daily. This means you can have sex at any time, rather than needing to take a pill from time to time as needed like other ED brands. The starting dose for daily-use Cialis is 2.5 milligrams (mg). If that doesn't work, you can increase your daily dose up to 5 mg. But is this the right approach for you—or are you better off with traditional ED drugs like Viagra, Levitra, or even the nondaily version of Cialis? If you are contemplating Cialis for daily use, consider these questions and then discuss it with your doctor: More »

Some drugs may cause your erectile dysfunction

One reason erectile dysfunction becomes more common with age is that older men are more likely to be on some kind of medication. In fact, an estimated 25% of all ED is a side effect of drugs, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Erectile Dysfunction: How medication, lifestyle changes, and other therapies can help you conquer this vexing problem. The most common types of medication that are linked to ED include antidepressants, anti-ulcer drugs, tranquilizers, and diuretics—which help the body get rid of sodium and water, and are used to treat heart failure, liver failure, and certain kidney disorders. More »

Talk with your doctor about erectile dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction can be tough to experience. Talking about erectile dysfunction can be even tougher. However, if you have difficulty getting or sustaining erections, you should speak with your doctor. Of course, such as a conversation is never easy, even for the most confident men. Here are three tips that may give you the assistance you need to discuss ED with your doctor, as found in the Harvard Special Health Report Erectile Dysfunction: How medication, lifestyle changes, and other therapies can help you conquer this vexing problem. 1. Find the words that are right for you.  Say some of these "icebreakers" to yourself, choose the one that feels most natural, and practice it aloud to yourself or with your partner before your appointment. Rehearsing just a little might boost your confidence and comfort level so you can follow through with your doctor: More »

Recharge your sexual energy

Men’s sexual drive can stay high late in life, but often their energy for sex gradually diminishes because of low testosterone levels, erectile dysfunction, poor sleep, or lack of exercise. Addressing these issues with their doctor and communicating with their partner to find mutual satisfaction can lead to increased sexual energy and intimacy. More »

B vitamins may raise risk of lung cancer in men who smoke

High dosages of vitamin B6 and B12 supplements were associated with three to four times the lung cancer risk in male smokers compared with smokers who did not use the vitamins. However, men who quit smoking for at least 10 years prior to the study, and also took the high dosages of the B vitamins, did not have a higher risk of lung cancer. More »