Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

The heart of a healthy sex life

Most men who have had a heart attack or heart surgery can resume their normal sex life after a brief recovery period. Other factors, like medication and severity, come into play. Still, the general guideline is that men can resume their regular sexual activity two weeks after a heart attack. After surgery, they can have sex once the incision has healed. (Locked) More »

The option of prostate cancer surgery

Men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer have a choice of several different approaches to therapy. Surgery called a prostatectomy involves removing the entire prostate gland. While this is the most invasive approach for treating prostate cancer, it may be the best option for men with aggressive prostate cancer that has not spread outside the gland. (Locked) More »

Mushrooms may protect against prostate cancer

Researchers found that men who consumed mushrooms at least once a week had lower risk of prostate cancer compared with those who ate no mushrooms. Scientists speculate that mushrooms’ high levels of ergothioneine, a potential cancer preventive, may explain the connection. More »

Prostate cancer and your sex life

Common treatments and management of prostate cancer, such as active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, and androgen deprivation therapy, also can affect a man’s sex life. Side effects may include poor sexual function, low libido, and erectile dysfunction. Understanding how these changes occur can help men in their choice of treatment. (Locked) More »

What does blood in my semen mean?

Blood in the semen can occur after a medical procedure, like a prostate biopsy, an enlarged prostate, or injury to the testicles or prostate, such as from horseback riding or bicycling. The condition often goes away on its own, but if it continues for more than three weeks, men should see their doctor. (Locked) More »

Biopsy of the Prostate and Transrectal Ultrasound

Your doctor is likely to recommend this test if you've had a rectal exam or blood tests that suggest that you might have prostate cancer. For this test, a urologist takes tissue samples from several places in your prostate, to be examined for cancer. A transrectal ultrasound helps the urologist see the prostate during the procedure. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take before scheduling the procedure. If you take aspirin, another NSAID or an anticoagulant medicine such as warfarin (Coumadin), your doctor will advise if changes need to be made for the biopsy. Be sure to mention any allergies, especially to antibiotics. Some doctors recommend that you have an enema the night before or the morning of the test. And some doctors also recommend taking an antibiotic one hour before the procedure starts. (Locked) More »

Will a pill really help your sex life?

Erectile dysfunction drugs are more readily available than ever before, and in general, men have gotten past any stigma about needing them to get or maintain an erection. Yet many men approach ED drugs the wrong way and think the pills can fix problems in their sex lives that are related to mental or emotional issues. (Locked) More »

Eating more nuts may improve sexual function

A recent study found that men who added 60 grams — about ½ cup or 360 calories—of a nut mixture made from almonds, hazelnuts, and walnuts to their daily diet was associated with improvement in several aspects of their sexual life. More »