Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

A salad a day keeps stroke away?

Eating plenty of nitrate-rich vegetables—such as lettuce, spinach, and beets—may lower a person’s risk of dying of a stroke or heart attack. The body converts nitrates into nitric oxide, a compound that lowers blood pressure. More »

Avoiding health risks at the farmers’ market

Going to a farmers’ market is a great way to load up on fresh fruits and vegetables. But one should be wary of buying products that may harbor bacteria that can cause foodborne illness. Those products include unpasteurized ciders or dairy foods, such as cheese or milk; and perishable homemade goods (sauces or meals), meat, and dairy products that are sold out of a cooler, without being properly refrigerated. After buying your food items, get them home within one to two hours. Once home, put food away as soon as possible. (Locked) More »

Food trends and your heart

The type and amount of fat, carbohydrate, sugar, and salt in our food supply has changed over the years. Some of these trends (such as the banning of harmful trans fatty acids) have been positive. But to date, efforts to reduce sugar and sodium haven’t been as successful. When shopping for processed foods—anything bagged, packaged, canned, or bottled—people should check the Nutrition Facts label. The healthiest choices contain less than 5% of the Daily Value for saturated fat and sodium, and less than 12 grams of sugar per serving. (Locked) More »

Getting to the heart of the fat issue

Fat has been shamed for so long, but it has a vital role in promoting greater heart health. Men need to cut out or greatly reduce their intake of saturated fat and replace it with healthier monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which are found in nuts, seeds, fish, and most oils. Adding these heart-healthy fats to regular meals and cooking methods often is the easiest way to increase a person’s intake. (Locked) More »

Does diet soda raise stroke risk?

The evidence linking diet sodas to a higher risk of stroke and dementia is weak. But there are other reasons to avoid artificial sweeteners, namely because they don’t seem to help with weight loss. Also, people who use them regularly may find less-sweet fruits and vegetables unappealing, which could lead them to miss out on nutrients in these foods. But sugar-sweetened beverages are closely tied to a higher likelihood of weight gain, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. Plain or sparkling water infused with fruit or other natural flavors is the healthiest choice. (Locked) More »

Is chocolate heart-healthy?

People who eat more chocolate have lower rates of heart attacks, heart failure, and death from heart disease. However, chocolate products are often rich in saturated fat and sugar, so they should be eaten in moderation. (Locked) More »

Think twice before going gluten-free

It appears that gluten does not prevent heart problems. People who eat low amounts of gluten often have diets low in whole grains. Restricting whole grains may be bad for heart health. More »

What can precision nutrition offer you?

Designing diets for good health based on a person’s DNA holds promise, but there is little evidence to support the effectiveness of personalized diets currently available on the Internet. (Locked) More »