Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

Cafeteria strategies that may improve your diet

Two strategies appear to help people in cafeterias make better food choices. One is labeling foods with traffic-light stickers to indicate if a food is healthy. The other is placing unhealthy foods in less accessible locations. More »

Comfort food without the guilt

To reduce dietary risks of comfort foods, it’s best to swap out unhealthy ingredients with healthier alternatives. For example, one could ditch full-fat dairy products like cream and butter, and instead use nonfat Greek yogurt or skim milk; ditch red meat in favor of poultry, fish, or legumes; ditch salt and use herbs and spices, such as oregano, rosemary, or basil; or ditch refined-grain noodles and use noodles made of whole wheat, black beans, lentils, or zucchini. (Locked) More »

Don't give up on grains

Many people are opting for low-carb diets and cutting out grains as a result. But when they do, they might be missing out on the nutritional benefits whole grains can bring. Whole grains are not only nutrient-rich but also contain fiber and cancer-fighting plant chemicals, known as phytochemicals. To eat more, try different varieties, including brown rice, barley, steel-cut oats, and quinoa. (Locked) More »

Is your lunch lacking?

Many Americans are in search of a healthier lunch, according to a study. People reported that it can be difficult to make good choices because they’re not always convenient, tasty, or readily available. More »

Legume of the month: Peas

Fresh peas are considered starchy vegetables by the U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Dried, split green peas similar to other beans  are classified as legumes. More »

The right way to "do lunch"

More than half of employed Americans who usually eat lunch on the job find it hard to eat a healthy lunch. One cafeteria-based study found that labeling foods with “traffic light” symbols that reflect their health value helped customers make better choices. They were less likely to choose “red light” foods, which were higher in fat and calories, and more likely to choose “green light” foods, which featured fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, or low-fat dairy as the main ingredient. Such healthy options for lunch may include garden (veggie) burgers and premade salads. (Locked) More »

Food ingredients under the microscope

New technology is allowing scientists to better understand how food ingredients and additives affect the body. Scientists recently found that one additive, propionate, which is used as a preservative in many food products including bread and other baked goods, may trigger an unhealthy surge in blood sugar that can lead to diabetes and obesity. Researchers are doing more studies on the preservative to confirm these initial findings. (Locked) More »

Legume of the month: Soybeans

Soybeans are a complete protein, meaning they contain all nine essential amino acids. They can be consumed in many different forms: as green soybeans (edamame), soybean oil, soy milk, and tofu. (Locked) More »

Quick-start guide to nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds are tiny packages of dense nutrition. They include protein, fiber, healthy fats, and many vitamins and minerals. For example, peanuts and pecans contain lots of B vitamins; almonds are rich in calcium and vitamin E; walnuts have lots of folate, vitamin E, and alpha-linoleic acid (ALA, an omega-3 fatty acid). And all nuts have magnesium. To add more nuts to meals, sprinkle a few into salads, sauces, vegetables, or whole grains such as brown rice or quinoa. Limit nut and seed intake to an ounce or two per day. (Locked) More »