Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.


Diseases & Conditions Articles

Why do my legs swell at the end of the day?

Leg swelling, also called edema, is caused by fluid buildup in the soft tissues beneath the skin. Modifying certain medications, keeping feet elevated when sitting, and wearing compression stockings can all help manage the condition. (Locked) More »

Feel woozy? Do this first

People who’ve never experienced wooziness should call 911 if the symptom comes on suddenly or severely, especially if it’s accompanied by other symptoms. However, a person who has experienced wooziness before or been unwell recently should sit down, have a drink of water or juice, and rest for 10 to 15 minutes. If the feeling of wooziness persists, if other symptoms develop, or if it’s hard to get up without feeling faint, one should call 911. More »

How does inflammation increase the risk for heart attacks?

We now understand why inflammation increases heart attack risk. As cholesterol invades the wall of the artery, the immune system treats it like it treats other invaders. Immune system cells infiltrate the artery wall, release inflammation-producing chemicals, and send signals for other cells to remove the cholesterol. Then a fibrous cap forms over the plaque. Inflammation inside the plaque can eventually eat away at that fibrous cap. If the cap ruptures, cholesterol and the inflammatory cells and chemicals suddenly spill into the artery, causing a blood clot to form and block blood flow. More »

Should I worry about a sudden swollen tongue?

A sudden swollen tongue can result from a side effect of medication like ACE inhibitors, an infection, vitamin B12 deficiency, and, in rare cases, an underactive thyroid gland. People should see a doctor if the condition doesn’t improve. (Locked) More »

The new-old way to treat gout

The American College of Rheumatology recently released updated guidelines on how to best treat gout and prevent future flare-ups. They included first-line treatments like anti-inflammatory medications and ice therapy. A combination of diet and lifestyle changes and medications (including urate lowering therapy, or ULT) —is typically recommended if attacks recur or become chronic. (Locked) More »

What could cause low blood pressure?

People who suffer from dizziness and weakness caused by low pressure should check their medication, especially for high blood pressure or heart disease. They should also monitor their water intake, as dehydration also can cause these problems. (Locked) More »

Don’t get upset about indigestion

It’s common for indigestion to become more frequent and severe with age, a condition called chronic dyspepsia or recurring indigestion. While most flare-ups can be treated with over-the-counter remedies, people can stop recurring problems by adopting lifestyle measures, such as reducing stress, avoiding excess alcohol, quitting smoking, losing extra weight, and eating smaller meals. (Locked) More »

Vaccination update

As scientists race to find a vaccine to ward off SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, doctors are reminding people to get other scheduled vaccinations. Older adults are advised to get their scheduled shots to protect against flu, shingles, pneumonia, and other infectious diseases. The benefits of vaccines may go beyond immunity to the germs they introduce; vaccines may help keep the immune system stay "fit" and give people a boost when they encounter other bugs. (Locked) More »