Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.


Diseases & Conditions Articles

A deeper look at psoriasis

Psoriasis, a common skin condition, affects more men than women. While it doesn’t affect everyone the same way, the approach to treatment and prevention is often similar. There is no cure yet for psoriasis. The optimal goal of treatment is to reduce affected areas to 1% or less of the body surface area within three months, and to manage triggers to help prevent future outbreaks. (Locked) More »

Bracing for flu season: Steps to protect yourself right now

Flu shots are not guaranteed to keep someone from getting influenza. Sometimes the shot is not a good match for the viruses that cause epidemics. Still, older adults should get the trivalent or quadrivalent flu shot, especially people who have diabetes or heart, lung, or kidney disease, or who take medication that suppresses the immune system. Other anti-flu precautions include washing hands often (with soap and warm water or hand sanitizer if soap is unavailable), and covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing. (Locked) More »

Is that brain fog really adult ADHD?

Sometimes older adults have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and don’t realize that symptoms such as forgetfulness and disorganization are linked to this condition. It’s possible that lifelong symptoms have been kept in check by structured, busy lifestyles. When structure fades away in retirement, symptoms may become more pronounced. An evaluation with a psychiatrist or psychologist can help. Medication is a mainstay of treatment for the attention challenges in ADHD, but behavior changes may be enough to help an older adult with ADHD cope with symptoms. (Locked) More »

What’s causing those swollen feet?

Sometimes swollen feet are a sign of an underlying problem. Swelling may signal vascular conditions, such as heart failure, venous insufficiency, deep-vein thrombosis, phlebitis, or liver disease or kidney disease. Swollen feet can also result when a person breaks a bone in the foot or develops tendinitis. Symptoms should be reported to a doctor if there’s so much swelling that it leaves an indentation when a finger is pressed into it, if it has developed suddenly, lasts for more than a few days, affects just one foot, or is accompanied by pain or discoloration of the skin. (Locked) More »

Moving away from knee osteoarthritis

An estimated 10% of men ages 60 and older having symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or aspirin, and steroid injections can temporarily soothe arthritis pain and inflammation. But an easier and safer way to manage symptoms is to be more active as bones and cartilage need the stimulation of regular movement to stay healthy and pain free. More »

Why wound healing gets harder as we age

Wounds in older adults can take a long time to heal. Treatment involves a combination of approaches such as debridement, special dressings, keeping pressure off the wound, exercising, taking a multivitamin, and eating a healthy diet with the recommended amounts of protein. Because wounds are tricky, it’s important to try to prevent them by switching positions often; keeping an eye out for nicks, cuts, and early signs of pressure wounds; and controlling conditions that can lead to wounds, such as diabetes and venous insufficiency. (Locked) More »