Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.


Diseases & Conditions Articles

An eye on glaucoma drugs

Glaucoma is a disease in which the eye does not drain fluid well. This can increase eye pressure, which damages the eye’s optic nerve and can lead to vision loss and blindness. Once glaucoma is diagnosed, treatment requires daily eye drop medication to slow or stop its progression. Four types of drugs and combinations of them are currently used, but two new drugs have been introduced that can benefit a subset of patients who need extra help to reduce eye pressure by improving fluid drainage. (Locked) More »

Is fibromyalgia real?

Fibromyalgia is a misunderstood but real condition that experts believe may be caused when the brain essentially overreacts to external stimuli that would not typically cause pain. (Locked) More »

Stay safe from superbugs

Superbugs are bacteria that have developed immunity to some or all antibiotics used to treat infections. Most often people will be infected with superbugs only in a hospital setting. But the risk of infection with a superbug can be reduced by washing hands regularly, reducing antibiotic use when possible, and asking questions about infection-control procedures in a hospital setting. (Locked) More »

Avoiding the pain of kidney stones

Kidney stones are small hard stones, formed when high levels of minerals in the urine crystallize in the kidneys, forming a pebble-like mass. They can be very painful, but luckily, they are largely preventable. Eating a healthy diet, drinking enough water, and understanding other risk factors, can help head them off before they become a problem. (Locked) More »

Common summer skin rashes

Several rashes can cause discomfort during the summer months. People often develop an itchy, oozing rash after brushing against certain plants, such as poison ivy. A rash of tiny bumps with a prickly sensation (known as prickly heat) can result from sweating while wearing tight clothing. Some people get an itchy rash as an allergic reaction to sun exposure. It helps to see a doctor if one has poison ivy or if a rash persists and interferes with sleeping, working, or relaxing. More »

What is lupus?

Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus for short) is an autoimmune disease. It occurs when the body mistakenly attacks the skin, joints, blood cells, kidneys, brain, and other organs. Medications can help suppress the autoimmune attack. (Locked) More »

Baby boomers: Don’t forget hepatitis C screenings

Despite a 2012 recommendation that all baby boomers get tested for hepatitis C, an analysis of government health surveys suggests that only about 13% of baby boomers had been tested for hepatitis C by 2015, up just one percentage point from 2013. More »