Mind & Mood

Your mood and your mental health affect every aspect of your life, from how you feel about yourself to your relationships with others and your physical health. There's a strong link between good mental health and good physical health, and vice versa. In the other direction, depression and other mental health issues can contribute to digestive disorders, trouble sleeping, lack of energy, heart disease, and other health issues.

There are many ways to keep your mind and mood in optimal shape. Exercise, healthy eating, and stress reduction techniques like meditation or mindfulness can keep your brain — and your body — in tip-top shape.

When mood and mental health slip, doing something about it as early as possible can keep the change from getting worse or becoming permanent. Treating conditions like depression and anxiety improve quality of life. Learning to manage stress makes for more satisfying and productive days.

Mind & Mood Articles

Blood test may find early signs of Alzheimer's

A new study found that a simple blood test can detect beta-amyloid protein buildup—one of the possible causes of Alzheimer’s disease—years before symptoms appear. The test is expected to be available to the public in a few years. More »

Shining a light on winter depression

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that occurs during the late fall and early winter, with lack of natural light cited as the main contributor. Adopting light therapy, which involves exposure from a light box for about 30 minutes a day, can help restore the brain chemical imbalances that contribute to SAD. More »

Difficult relationships linked to bone loss

Stressful interpersonal relationships may be linked to bone loss in women, according to a new study. Women who reported higher levels of stress saw bigger reductions in bone density than women who reported less stress. More »

Study links certain medications to a higher risk of dementia

In a recent study, researchers found a potential link between anticholinergic medications, used to treat a wide variety of conditions, including allergies, depression, gastrointestinal problems, Parkinson’s disease, incontinence and overactive bladder, and a higher risk of dementia. But experts say study limitations may cloud the results. (Locked) More »

The thinking on brain games

Engaging in brain games, such as crosswords, chess, and bridge, as well as creative outlets like painting, playing an instrument, or learning a language, have not been proven to protect against memory loss. Yet, these pursuits can help with everyday thinking skills and, when teamed with regular exercise, can increase a person’s cognitive reserve. (Locked) More »

A purpose-driven life may last longer

Having a purpose in life may help improve health, according to a new study. Study authors found that people who have a strong life purpose were less likely to die from cardiovascular disease and other conditions than people who don’t. Volunteering, contributing to the well-being of family members, and hobbies are all things that people report give them purpose in life. (Locked) More »

Don’t buy into brain health supplements

About 25% of adults over age 50 take a supplement to improve their brain health. While these products promise benefits like enhanced memory and greater attention and focus, research has not found solid proof they work. People can get more brain benefits from doing regular aerobic exercise and adopting a plant-based diet. More »