Latest from Harvard Health

In search of a milk alternative

People who are unable to or don’t want to drink cow’s milk have alternatives. Lactose-free milk has an enzyme added to it that helps break down lactose into more easily digested sugars. Soy milk is the fluid that’s strained from… More »

Stressful job may raise stroke risk

Having a demanding job with little control may slightly increase the risk of a stroke. Job strain may activate factors that predispose a person to developing a blood clot, which can lead to a stroke. (Locked) More »

Exercise is still the best medicine

Better medicines and safer procedures have contributed to the increase in longevity, but exercise may be the key ingredient in the mixture that allows some people to not only survive but also thrive in later life. Aging takes place on… More »

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Meet the Harvard Health Experts

Anne Fabiny, MD Featured Expert:

Anne Fabiny, MD

Dr. Anne Fabiny is a primary care physician and geriatrician at Cambridge Health Alliance and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She is Chief of Geriatrics at Cambridge Health Alliance and Medical Director of its Elder Service Plan. In 2011, Dr. Fabiny was awarded Harvard Medical School’s Charles McCabe, M.D., Faculty Prize for Excellence in Teaching. She earned her medical degree from the University of Wisconsin Medical School, where she did her internship and residency in family medicine, and completed a fellowship in geriatric medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Karen Carlson, MD

Karen Carlson, MD

Dr. Karen Carlson is Director of Women's Health Associates at Massachusetts General Hospital and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Her areas of interest include hysterectomy and alternative treatments for nonmalignant gynecologic conditions, ovarian cancer screening, breast cancer prevention and screening, and communication issues in the doctor-patient relationship. She is co-editor of a medical textbook, Primary Care of Women, and a comprehensive book on women's health, The Harvard Guide to Women's Health.

Kenneth Arndt, MD

Kenneth Arndt, MD

Dr. Kenneth Arndt is a dermatologist in the Boston area and Clinical Professor of Dermatology (emeritus) at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Arndt has had a strong impact on the practice and perception of dermatology, both nationally and internationally.

A fourth generation Californian, he attended the University of California at Berkeley and earned his medical degree at Yale University School of Medicine. He trained in dermatology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Department of Dermatology at Harvard Medical School.

In addition to his affiliation with Harvard Medical School, Dr. Arndt is Adjunct Professor of Medicine (Dermatology) at Dartmouth Medical School, Adjunct Professor of Dermatology at Brown Medical School, and the president of SkinCare Physicians in Boston. He was Dermatologist-in-Chief at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center for over two decades.

The Kenneth A. Arndt Professorship in Dermatology was established at Harvard Medical School in 2000 "in recognition of Dr. Arndt's many contributions to the field." The current and all future chairs of the Department of Dermatology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center carry the title of the Kenneth A. Arndt Professor.

Dr. Arndt has broad clinical and research interests, particularly regarding medical therapeutics and laser photomedicine. He is the author or editor of over 15 books and 300 scientific publications, and has been course director of many national and international meetings. He served as editor in chief of the Archives of Dermatology for two decades.

Martha K. Richardson, MD

Martha K. Richardson, MD

Dr. Martha Richardson is a general obstetrician/gynecologist at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology at Harvard Medical School.

She earned her medical degree at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, did her internship at Cambridge Hospital in Cambridge, MA, and completed her residency at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Richardson is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Dr. Richardson's strong interest in women's health extends beyond the office and the hospital. She has contributed to every version of Our Bodies Ourselves since its second edition, and has been on the Medical Advisory Board of the Harvard Women's Health Watch since its first issue. She has conceived and edited dozens of patient publications for Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates and the North American Menopause Society.

Paula A. Johnson, MD, MPH

Paula A. Johnson, MD, MPH

Dr. Paula A. Johnson is the executive director of the Connors Center for Women's Health and Gender Biology and Chief of the Division of Women's Health at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Professor of Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health. An internationally recognized cardiologist, Johnson brings a broad range of experience as a physician, researcher, and expert in public health and health policy to bear in the effort to transform the health of women in the United States and around the world.

Over the last 15 years, Dr. Johnson has led initiatives to improve the health of the City of Boston, including leading the development of a roadmap to improve access to and the quality of primary care in Boston that included stakeholders from all sectors of healthcare. She recently co-chaired the Public Health and Healthcare Transition Team for the City of Boston, as the first new administration in 20 years assumed office.

Dr. Johnson attended Harvard and Radcliffe Colleges, received her medical degree from Harvard Medical School, and trained in internal medicine and cardiovascular medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital. A native of Brooklyn, New York, she lives in the Boston area with her husband and two children.