Latest from Harvard Health

A wake-up call on coffee

Straight coffee minus the cream and sugar is a nearly calorie-free beverage brimming with antioxidants. It might ease artery-damaging inflammation and deliver substances that help the body regulate blood sugar. However, super-sweet coffee drinks can pack on the pounds and… More »

Boost the power of your breakfast cereal

The healthiest breakfast cereals are those made with whole grains, such as corn, wheat, or brown rice. Fiber is another important component of a breakfast cereal. A healthy serving should have at least 5 or more grams of fiber. It’s… More »

iPad can disrupt sleep, study suggests

Harvard researchers found that reading an 2010-model iPad before bedtime reset the circadian clock, causing people to feel less alert in the morning. Newer e-readers might not have this effect. More »

Recent Blog Posts

Meet the Harvard Health Experts

Gregory D. Curfman, MD Featured Expert:

Gregory D. Curfman, MD

Dr. Gregory Curfman is the Editor in Chief of Harvard Health Publications. He is on the faculty of Harvard Medical School and the affiliated faculty of Harvard Law School. Before joining Harvard Health Publications, Dr. Curfman was the Executive Editor of The New England Journal of Medicine, which has the highest impact factor of any medical journal. While at the Journal, he founded Perspective, the journal's lead section, which focuses on the intersection between medicine and society, including health policy and health-care reform.

Dr. Curfman is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. He earned his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, and trained in internal medicine and cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. He directed the Coronary Care Unit at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Cardiovascular Health Center, a heart disease prevention program at Massachusetts General Hospital.

In addition to writing scores of editorials and Perspective articles for The New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Curfman has given testimony to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. He has also contributed amicus briefs in Supreme Court health law cases.

Gad A. Marshall, MD

Gad A. Marshall, MD

Dr. Gad A. Marshall is a behavioral neurologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital and Assistant Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. He has been the site principal investigator for multiple clinical trials of amyloid-modifying drugs in Alzheimer’s disease and is currently the site principal investigator for the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. His research has focused on clinical correlates of activities of daily living and neuropsychiatric symptoms with cortical atrophy, in vivo amyloid deposition, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and synaptic integrity in clinically normal elderly, mild cognitive impairment, and mild Alzheimer's disease dementia. Most recently, he has been developing a new performance-based and subjective scale of activities of daily living that will detect the earliest functional deficits at the stage of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease.

Donald T. Reilly, MD, PhD

Donald T. Reilly, MD, PhD

Dr. Donald T. Reilly is an orthopedic surgeon at New England Baptist Hospital and Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. A prolific speaker, he has been invited to lecture internationally. Dr. Reilly has written a number of articles which have been published in numerous journals including the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

After earning his medical degree and Ph.D. in bioengineering from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Dr. Reilly completed his internship at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center followed by The Harvard Combined Orthopedic Residency.

Dr. Reilly's clinical interests include the hip, knee, and adult joint reconstruction.

I-Min Lee, ScD, MBBS

I-Min Lee, ScD, MBBS

Dr. I-Min Lee is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research primarily focuses on the role of physical activity in preventing chronic diseases and enhancing longevity, and in women’s health. She has served on various national expert panels addressing physical activity and health, including the 1996 Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health, the 2007 updated recommendation for adults from the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association, and the 2011 position stand from the American College of Sports Medicine. She served on the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee, writing the scientific report on which the 2008 US Department of Health and Human Services physical activity guidelines — the first comprehensive physical activity guidelines by the US federal government for Americans — are based. She has also provided her expertise to international panels formulating physical activity recommendations, including those from the WHO, Canada and Singapore.

Isaac Schiff, MD

Isaac Schiff, MD

Dr. Isaac Schiff is chief of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Joe Vincent Meigs Professor of Gynecology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Schiff graduated from McGill Medical School and did his residency in obstetrics and gynecology as well as a fellowship in reproductive endocrinology at the Boston Hospital for Women (now Brigham and Women's Hospital). He was Director of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Brigham and Women's Hospital before moving to Massachusetts General Hospital. At MGH he was responsible for initiating the obstetrics program, the in-vitro fertility program, and the division of urogynecology.

Dr. Schiff is one of the founding trustees of the North American Menopause Society and has served as Editor-in-Chief of its journal Menopause since its inception. Dr. Schiff is also Chairman of the Medical Advisory Board of Pause, a consumer journal of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

He is also a winner of Harvard Medical School's Dean's Award for the support and advancement of women faculty.