Latest from Harvard Health

4 ways to maintain your brain

Many people want to build up some "insurance" against dementia and other memory problems. But there's no need to invest in pricey brain-training programs. Instead, do-it-yourself lifestyle changes have been shown to help ward off memory loss and dementia, reports… More »

Ringing in the ears? It might be tinnitus

Hearing a ringing sound when there aren't any bells nearby may be tinnitus (pronounced tin-NIGHT-us or TIN-nih-tus), a hearing problem that affects up to one in 10 men (and women). For some, the ringing, hissing, buzzing, and other sounds of… More »

Myths about cholesterol-lowering statins

More than one in four adults ages 45 and older in the United States take a cholesterol-lowering statin. But these popular medications are often misunderstood. The February 2015 Harvard Heart Letter explores four common statin-related myths. Myth: Statins cause memory… More »

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Meet the Harvard Health Experts

Anthony Komaroff, MD Featured Expert:

Anthony Komaroff, MD

Anthony Komaroff is the Steven P. Simcox/Patrick A. Clifford/James H. Higby Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Senior Physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Editor-in-Chief of Harvard Health Publications. He was Director of the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Brigham and Women’s Hospital for 15 years and is the Founding Editor of Journal Watch, a summary medical information newsletter for physicians published by the Massachusetts Medical Society/New England Journal of Medicine.

A practicing physician, Dr. Komaroff also teaches courses on clinical medicine and clinical research methods at Harvard Medical School. He has served as an advisory board member for the Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and for the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He is the author of over 200 journal articles and book chapters and of one book. In recognition of his accomplishments, Dr. Komaroff has been elected as a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Gad A. Marshall, MD

Gad A. Marshall, MD

Dr. Gad A. Marshall is a behavioral neurologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital and Assistant Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. He has been the site principal investigator for multiple clinical trials of amyloid-modifying drugs in Alzheimer’s disease and is currently the site principal investigator for the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. His research has focused on clinical correlates of activities of daily living and neuropsychiatric symptoms with cortical atrophy, in vivo amyloid deposition, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and synaptic integrity in clinically normal elderly, mild cognitive impairment, and mild Alzheimer's disease dementia. Most recently, he has been developing a new performance-based and subjective scale of activities of daily living that will detect the earliest functional deficits at the stage of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease.

Donald T. Reilly, MD, PhD

Donald T. Reilly, MD, PhD

Dr. Donald T. Reilly is an orthopedic surgeon at New England Baptist Hospital and Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. A prolific speaker, he has been invited to lecture internationally. Dr. Reilly has written a number of articles which have been published in numerous journals including the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

After earning his medical degree and Ph.D. in bioengineering from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Dr. Reilly completed his internship at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center followed by The Harvard Combined Orthopedic Residency.

Dr. Reilly's clinical interests include the hip, knee, and adult joint reconstruction.

I-Min Lee, ScD, MBBS

I-Min Lee, ScD, MBBS

Dr. I-Min Lee is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research primarily focuses on the role of physical activity in preventing chronic diseases and enhancing longevity, and in women’s health. She has served on various national expert panels addressing physical activity and health, including the 1996 Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health, the 2007 updated recommendation for adults from the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association, and the 2011 position stand from the American College of Sports Medicine. She served on the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee, writing the scientific report on which the 2008 US Department of Health and Human Services physical activity guidelines — the first comprehensive physical activity guidelines by the US federal government for Americans — are based. She has also provided her expertise to international panels formulating physical activity recommendations, including those from the WHO, Canada and Singapore.

Isaac Schiff, MD

Isaac Schiff, MD

Dr. Isaac Schiff is chief of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Joe Vincent Meigs Professor of Gynecology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Schiff graduated from McGill Medical School and did his residency in obstetrics and gynecology as well as a fellowship in reproductive endocrinology at the Boston Hospital for Women (now Brigham and Women's Hospital). He was Director of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Brigham and Women's Hospital before moving to Massachusetts General Hospital. At MGH he was responsible for initiating the obstetrics program, the in-vitro fertility program, and the division of urogynecology.

Dr. Schiff is one of the founding trustees of the North American Menopause Society and has served as Editor-in-Chief of its journal Menopause since its inception. Dr. Schiff is also Chairman of the Medical Advisory Board of Pause, a consumer journal of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

He is also a winner of Harvard Medical School's Dean's Award for the support and advancement of women faculty.