Ear, nose, throat

Ear, nose, throat Articles

Preventing seasonal maladies

Older adults are especially susceptible to winter illnesses. This is partly because of a weakened immune system. Common winter illnesses include the common cold, sinusitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, influenza, and stomach bugs. To ward off winter illness, one should get the proper vaccines, wash hands before eating or touching the face, carry hand sanitizer, avoid close contact with people who’re under the weather, and stay away from shared food like potlucks and buffets. More »

Poor sense of smell may predict risk of death in older adults

Shorter term studies have suggested a link between loss of smell among older adults and risk of death. A new report confirms that the association between loss of smell and earlier death persists over more than a decade and identifies the leading causes: cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. More »

Straight talk about your voice

It’s common for a man’s voice to change as he ages, a condition called presbylaryngis, or aging of the larynx. The result is often that raspy, hoarse tone known as “old age” voice. Medication side effects and lifestyle habits also can contribute to presbylaryngis, but there are many self-help strategies that can strengthen and protect your voice. (Locked) More »

Sniffing out sinus relief

Chronic sinusitis strikes when inflammation leads to swelling within the lining of the sinuses. This can interfere with normal drainage, cause mucus buildup, and make it hard to breathe through the nose. Over-the-counter treatments and home remedies can often control the problem, although surgery is sometimes needed for severe cases. (Locked) More »

Is vertigo caused by a magnesium deficiency?

There is little evidence that vertigo is due to magnesium deficiency or prevented by magnesium supplementation. However, there is some evidence linking low vitamin D levels with vertigo and suggesting that vitamin D supplementation may be helpful. (Locked) More »

Make your voice heard!

Aging changes the voice, typically because the vocal cords thin out, the lungs don’t work as well as they used to, and cartilage in the larynx hardens. What’s not normal is when voice changes are so dramatic they interfere with the ability to communicate. These changes may reflect such causes as neck or chest surgery, smoking, or silent acid reflux. But almost all voice disorders are treatable. Treatment usually involves addressing underlying conditions and a course of voice therapy with a speech therapist. (Locked) More »

What to do for earwax

Keep objects out of the ear. The ear’s natural mechanisms usually minimize wax accumulation. Impacted wax, which is more common in older people and those who wear hearing aids, should be medically removed. More »