A more precise approach to fighting cancer

Precision medicine is an emerging approach to disease treatment and prevention that takes into account a person’s genes, environment, and lifestyle, and eliminates the one-size-fits-all approach to health care. Right now the greatest focus is on cancer. Doctors rely on genetic tests, family history, lifestyle habits, and environmental factors to determine if someone is more likely to get certain forms of cancer. Doctors then can use genetic testing to identify mutations in a tumor in order to match it with the best drug treatment. (Locked) More »

When is body temperature too low?

Older adults tend to have lower body temperatures—an average of 97.7° F. While this is not cause for alarm, they should be mindful about prolonged exposure to cold environments and even the slightest fever. (Locked) More »

Is there a way to treat seborrheic keratosis?

Seborrheic keratoses are raised, rough lesions that appear typically on the trunk, back, face, or neck after age 50. They are not cancerous or contagious, and there is no way to prevent them or stop them from returning once removed. (Locked) More »

When worry becomes a problem

People with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) constantly anticipate disaster and are overly concerned about issues like health, money, and family even when there is no apparent reason for concern. Left alone to manifest, GAD can lead to serious health problems, like high blood pressure, depression, and unhealthy behavior like excessive drinking. More »

Give spinning a whirl

Spinning classes offer a great cardiovascular workout for older men and can help build lower-body muscle strength. Spinning is also a low-impact exercise that places less stress on the joints, which makes it ideal for men with knee or hip issues or those recovering from orthopedic injuries. (Locked) More »

The skinny on fatty liver disease

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, is a dangerous and often difficult to detect condition. The disease affects up to 25% of American adults, 60% of whom are men, and raises a person’s risk of heart disease and diabetes. However, adopting a proper exercise routine and making dietary changes can reduce a person’s risk, and, in someone diagnosed with the disease, even reverse its effects. (Locked) More »

The right plant-based diet for you

Following a plant-based diet is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. But not all plant-based diets are the same. Most emphasize certain foods with heart benefits, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and healthy oils like olive oil. However, some plant foods, such as fruit juices, refined grains like white pasta and white rice, processed breads and cereals, and potatoes can have a harmful effect. The goal is to emphasize heart-healthy plants and switch out unhealthy plant foods as well as animal foods. More »