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Inducing labor: A way to avoid a cesarean?

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March 07, 2018

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Comments

miranda
May 04, 2018

This is a very important mistake, because the likely reason that women induced at 39 weeks have fewer Cesareans than women who are expectantly managed is that most of the women in the expected management group will have gone into labor at 40-42 weeks gestation rather than right at 39 weeks. Babies get larger in the womb during these final days or weeks, and bigger babies result in a higher incidence of Cesareans.

Marie
April 24, 2018

This sentence flatly incorrectly describes the nature of the comparison performed by the study investigators: “The ARRIVE trial…was designed to compare the health of babies delivered when labor is induced to those born when labor occurred spontaneously at 39 weeks.” What the study actually did was compare women who were randomly selected into induction at 39 weeks to a control group of women who received “expectant management” as a treatment, which means waiting until labor commences naturally or until a medical indication for induction of CS arises. This is a very important mistake, because the likely reason that women induced at 39 weeks have fewer Cesareans than women who are expectantly managed is that most of the women in the expected management group will have gone into labor at 40-42 weeks gestation rather than right at 39 weeks. Babies get larger in the womb during these final days or weeks, and bigger babies result in a higher incidence of Cesareans. Misreporting the nature of this study will leave readers in the dark about why this seemingly counterintuitive result makes sense.

Nicole
March 13, 2018

Yet no one is talking about the horrid side effects of the induction “medications”, which are NOT approved for use on pregnant women for this purpose!! There is NO FDA approval for pitocin or cytotec for induction. Inducing labor is dangerous and causes adverse long term issues. It is causing an abortion and harming the baby. The insert itself even says can cause uterine rupture!! This article is GARBAGE and should be removed!

Barbara Holloway
March 10, 2018

What a sad story about the author’s mother. When my mother broke her hip, she was clearly confused and not her usual self in the hospital. When I asked her doctor why, he would tell me, “Mother has dementia.” I told him she wasn’t like that when she was admitted. He never provided an explanation. So much I have learned too late. Thank you for your excellent and informative explanation about this common hazard of being in the hospital.

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