Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

Exercise can help you keep your bones strong

Resistance training exercises aren’t just good for your heart; they can also improve your bone health. While adult women may not be able to build new bone as rapidly as children do, activities such as jogging and resistance training can stimulate new growth that can prevent age-related bone loss and osteoporosis. (Locked) More »

Is it safe for women to drink alcohol?

Women should avoid alcohol if they are pregnant or if they have a personal or family history of breast cancer, liver disease, or alcohol abuse. For other women, one drink a day is generally healthy. (Locked) More »

Unmasking the causes and treatments of melasma

Melasma is sometimes referred to as the mask of pregnancy, because hormones can trigger these dark areas on the face. But the condition isn’t limited to pregnancy, and without treatment, it may last for many years. One of the best ways to help reverse melasma is by being diligent about protecting your skin from the sun. (Locked) More »

Blockage or no blockage, take heart attacks seriously

For years, many doctors thought that heart attacks that weren’t caused by a major blockage were less serious than those that were. New research shows, however, that people who have this type of heart attack—known as a myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries (MINOCA)—are at higher risk for future cardiovascular events, and doctors should treat the condition aggressively. (Locked) More »

Baby’s early arrival may hint at future heart problems for mom

Women who deliver a baby before the 37th week of pregnancy and experience rising blood pressure in the years that follow are more likely to develop signs of coronary artery disease, raising their risk of heart attack and stroke. Preterm delivery should be considered a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disease. (Locked) More »

Diet might delay — or hasten — the onset of menopause

Researchers linked consumption of certain foods to age at menopause. They found that women who consumed more oily fish and legumes went through menopause later, while those who ate more refined pasta and rice began the change earlier. Regardless of any potential effect on age at menopause, adopting a healthful diet is always a good idea. (Locked) More »