Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

Belly fat may pose more danger for women than for men

Weight carried around the middle may signal a greater risk for heart attack in women than in men with belly fat. Strategies to prevent weight gain can help reduce this risk. Monitoring waist-to-hip ratio can help indicate a potential problem. Whittling the waist requires reducing calories and increasing physical activity. (Locked) More »

Is this normal?

Different women experience different types of vaginal discharge. There is a wide range of “normal.” However, some symptoms like postmenopausal bleeding do warrant a closer look from the doctor. (Locked) More »

Pelvic physical therapy: Another potential treatment option

Unexplained pelvic plain is common in women of all ages and is sometimes related to problems with the muscles in the pelvic floor, a condition called myofascial pain. Tight pelvic floor muscles can cause chronic pain, and pelvic physical therapy is a potential treatment that may help to relieve this pain. (Locked) More »

Hidden risk factors that could put your heart in danger

Women who had gestational diabetes or pre-eclampsia during pregnancy have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease later in life. As a result, they should take prevention seriously and be aggressive about lifestyle interventions. (Locked) More »

Treatments for breast cancer may harm the heart

Women treated for breast cancer may face a heightened risk of heart disease from the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. But physicians known as cardio-oncologists can offer strategies to both prevent and treat heart damage from cancer therapy. These include echocardiograms before and after treatment to monitor any possible abnormalities, as well as changes to medications such as statins and blood pressure drugs. Physical activity may also decrease the risk of heart injuries related to breast cancer treatment. (Locked) More »

When the arrival of menopause brings symptoms of depression

The odds of experiencing symptoms of depression go up as women reach perimenopause and early postmenopause. Hormone therapy has been shown to help ward off these symptoms. But experts say despite the findings, hormone therapy should be used for prevention only in limited circumstances, because the treatment brings its own risks. More »

Will removing your fallopian tubes reduce your risk of ovarian cancer?

Some cases of ovarian cancer originate in the fallopian tubes. Some experts recommend that women who are undergoing pelvic surgery consider having their fallopian tubes removed, a strategy that may help prevent ovarian cancer. But there are potential risks of tube removal should be balanced against the potential benefits. A lack of information about the long-term risks of the procedure is one factor to consider. (Locked) More »

Study finds weak link between birth control and breast cancer

A new study shows that hormonal birth control could raise a woman’s risk of breast cancer, but only by a small amount. However, women over age 40 who use hormonal birth control may want to ask their doctors about whether they should shift to nonhormonal contraception. (Locked) More »