Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

Study links gum disease to cancer in older women

A new study shows that women with periodontal disease may be at higher risk of cancer, but some experts say they’re skeptical because of study limitations. Even so, it’s important to protect gum health, because periodontal disease has been linked to other health conditions. (Locked) More »

Test may someday help predict diabetes risk

A new test called lipoprotein insulin resistance may more accurately predict whether a woman will develop type 2 diabetes than existing methods of assessing risk, such as family history of the disease, body mass index, and blood glucose levels. The test can pick up on signs of insulin resistance, which can lead to diabetes, before a woman has an abnormal glucose test. (Locked) More »

Women’s stroke rate stubbornly steady

A recent study found that while the stroke rate among men has dropped in recent years, the risk for women has stayed the same. While men may be benefiting from prevention and treatment efforts for high blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes, women do not seem to be reaping the same benefits. This may reflect some risk factors specific to women that should be given additional attention. (Locked) More »

Don’t underestimate your heart risks

Two new surveys show that women and their physicians may not be taking women’s cardiovascular risks as seriously as they should be. Women are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than from any other health condition, but both women and doctors appear to underestimate this risk. A proactive discussion with your doctor can help you protect your heart and your health. (Locked) More »

An aspirin a day for your health?

Low-dose aspirin use has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer. But it’s not right for all women and can lead to serious complications, including gastrointestinal bleeding. A thorough risk analysis should be conducted by your doctor before you consider starting a low-dose aspirin regimen. (Locked) More »

Gender equality? Not when it comes to alcohol and the brain

Men and women are not created equal when it comes to alcohol. Women may be more prone to negative health effects related to drinking. A new study shows alcohol may also affect their brains differently, specifically the reward center of the brain. This may mean that women need gender-specific treatments for alcohol-use disorders. (Locked) More »

Is my bruising normal?

If you find that you are bruising more easily, it may be due to aging, which causes changes to your blood vessels and skin that make bruising more likely. More »

How clean should your skin be?

Probiotic skin products, which are designed to encourage the growth of beneficial bacteria, are promising options for treating skin conditions in the future. However, there is no scientific evidence that currently available probiotic skin products are effective. More »

Getting a start on growing stronger

Strength and power training can slow muscle loss and can also help prevent or control arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis and improve cognitive function. The exercises described can be performed at home with minimal equipment. More »

Should you have an annual pelvic exam?

Expert groups disagree over the value of an annual pelvic exam for healthy women without symptoms of pelvic diseases. Women should discuss the potential risks and benefits as well as their personal preferences with their doctors. (Locked) More »