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Proposed recommendations question the value of calcium, vitamin D supplements

Food-sources-of-calcium
Published: June 27, 2012

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Comments

Christina
August 23, 2012

Not even an hour ago, I saw a commercial on TV about how “women do not absorb calcium like they need to” … obviously they were selling some sort of calcium supplement, aimed at women.

I can even think of a few women who I know who take calcium supplements with added D3. Maybe I’ll have to show them this article! lol

simon
August 22, 2012

Hi,
Diets are hard for some people to stick to, as when we see some nice looking cakes or sweets we just can not refuse. For me I must stay on a low fat diet because of have illness (pancreatitis and gallstone,kidney stone). It changes the way one looks at life and being healthy.

Having a healthy diets is a must if you want to stay healthy in life, as my bad diet is how I became very ill.

SO always watch what you are eating.

Do you know no foods are bad for you – It is just the way you cook them and when to eat them. Some foods must be avoided with some illnesses.

stay healthy and good luck with your diets..

warmest regards, simon newcombe…

Fubao
August 07, 2012

Some products claimed to have “professional grade” ingredients. Are they better than the normal OTCs?

Brian
August 02, 2012

Any extreme “overdose” of supplements can be adversary to your health. In fact any extreme “overdose” of anything is generally not good for you. Important research should be done on what supplements / vitamins you are taking, and a general overview of your diet – so that you can ensure you are not overdoing it!

Paul F Davis
July 30, 2012

Wow! A post and discussion on research showing supplements doing more harm than good.

Much needed! I have for a long time wanted to read something on vitamin supplement toxicity.

Please write more on this topic.

thanh
August 03, 2012

I tend to agree that most of us should be getting calcium from the kitchen. Vitamin D3 is another story all together though. The “recommended” dose of 600 IU per day is laughable when you consider that many people taking sometimes twice that dose are still way below the suggested effective level of 40 ng/ml (25(OH)D) in their blood.

That being said, IMHO it’s most important that those concerned about their Vitamin d3 levels get the 25-hydroxyvitamin D test. That way an effective dose can be accurately sought out and actually begin to have it’s positive effects.

Ern
July 10, 2012

Though there is a proliferation of supplements and vitamins today – and many are consuming them, caution really should be observed. Great to know about this study. Ern

nahid naznin
July 07, 2012

Nice article.I always think one thing,for dietary suppliment,why should we go for medicine!!!There are so many dietary sources of calcium and vitamin D.Natural sources are always best.

Yerushalmi
July 03, 2012

Isn’t it incredible, we are told to give a newborn throughout it’s first year of life 400IU of Vitamin D3 yet the USPSTF recommends only 600IU for an adult weighing about 20 times as much !In my practice adults need to take 4-5 thousand IU of Vitamin D3 just to enter the lower end of the ” normal ” range, perhaps the USPSTF should have lowered the normal range values to fit in with their dosage recommendation ?

anekdotai
July 03, 2012

grean leave and vegitables are great For Vitamin B2, B3.

Calcium challenged
July 02, 2012

I have looked at your list, and then at the USDA list, and there are discrepancies, such as, you say that canned salmon has 300mgs of Calcium, here is what USDA says:

15084 Fish, salmon, pink, canned, total can contents 85 3 oz 183 mgs.

So it’s hard to do this with conflicting information. Can you help?

Just a question.
June 30, 2012

Calcium is fairly easy to acquire from a normal diet. Most vitamins and minerals are best acquired that way as the medical profession is quick to point out. There is a blind spot here .The best most natural source of vitamin d is sun exposure it is interesting to note no evidence from randomized trails shows the effect of long term vitamin d deficiency because of sun avoidance across a variety of endpoints :yet the mantra is avoid any sun exposure .Growing evidence indicates UVR may add benefit in certain conditions beyond the D3 produced see the recent study by Dr. Hector Delucca .To draw any conclusions from the 400iu of d3 beyond the fact that that is such a small amount of d3 that it may well have been lost in the noise.

hatiputera
June 29, 2012

wow very awesome article regarding the calcium vitamin. Is it 600 IU per day is very high?

CLS88
June 28, 2012

600 I.U. of vitamin D is the amount produced (precursor) with less than 1 minute of sun exposure, midday, wearing a bathing suit.

Does anyone, in any profession, think humans did not regularly produce at least 10 X this, typical daily sun exposure (May-Sept.- Northern Hemisphere), during normal diurnal activity?

The issue has always been supplemented calcium, with a lack of sufficient vitamin D.

Light skinned humans will produce at least 10,000 I.U. (up to 20,000 I.U.)in 30 minutes of sunbathing. That’s UV contacting skin, as a species doing work, recreating, or simply enjoying the feeling of the sun.

Cardiologists have known for at least 15 years that supplementing calcium increased fatal heart attacks by 25%+ in certain demographics.

Get your calcium from food- it’s everywhere. Think intelligently about the amount of vitamin D produced naturally by even 5 minutes of full sun exposure…in our birthday suits (5,000 I.U.+).

600 i.u. of vitamin D is essentially meaningless…

A horse pill of calcium with too few/little cofactors is flushed through our kidneys or sticks to our arteries…

June 28, 2012

Thanks for the information. For Vitamin B2, B3, you can eat the vegetables and green leaves those are rich in vitamins.

Vitamin D3 Dosage May Actually Be Too Low
June 27, 2012

I tend to agree that most of us should be getting calcium from the kitchen. Vitamin D3 is another story all together though. The “recommended” dose of 600 IU per day is laughable when you consider that many people taking sometimes twice that dose are still way below the suggested effective level of 40 ng/ml (25(OH)D) in their blood.

That being said, IMHO it’s most important that those concerned about their Vitamin d3 levels get the 25-hydroxyvitamin D test. That way an effective dose can be accurately sought out and actually begin to have it’s positive effects.

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