Smoking

Smoking Articles

B vitamins may raise risk of lung cancer in men who smoke

High dosages of vitamin B6 and B12 supplements were associated with three to four times the lung cancer risk in male smokers compared with smokers who did not use the vitamins. However, men who quit smoking for at least 10 years prior to the study, and also took the high dosages of the B vitamins, did not have a higher risk of lung cancer. More »

Midlife heart health shows a link with future risk of dementia

People who have high blood pressure and diabetes and who smoke during middle age have a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. These vascular (blood vessel) risk factors may leave them more prone to dementia 25 years later. Having diabetes in middle age may be almost as risky as having the gene variant known as APOE4, which is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Even slightly elevated blood pressure during midlife may be associated with dementia in later life. (Locked) More »

Are you at risk for COPD?

COPD includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, severe asthma, or a combination of these conditions. They cause inflammation, destruction or abnormal repair of airways and lung tissue, which reduces airflow. Even though most cases of COPD are linked to smoking, about a fifth of all cases are linked to other causes, such as poorly controlled asthma, abnormal lung development, and air pollution. Treatment may involve inhaled medications to reduce inflammation and to open the airways, antibiotics, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation (exercise, education, and support), and surgical or nonsurgical procedures to improve lung function. More »

As an ex-smoker, am I still at high risk for lung cancer?

Quitting smoking is the best health move any person can make. Improved lung function and lower heart attack risk can happen almost immediately after someone quits smoking, but it takes more than 10 years of not smoking to see a dramatic decrease in cancer risk. (Locked) More »

Secondhand smoke boosts stroke risk

People who spend at least an hour a week in close contact with a smoker may have a 30% higher risk of stroke compared with people who are not exposed to secondhand smoke. (Locked) More »

E-cigarettes and health: the jury is still out

Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes for short) are battery-operated devices that give off a vapor that contains nicotine. They look like cigarettes, and offer the feel of smoking a cigarette, without the smoke or the tobacco. Some e-cigarette users say they are "smoking." Others call it "vaping." If you're trying to quit smoking, e-cigarettes can be very appealing. They fill the need for something to hold and inhale—two things can be hard to give up. E-cigarettes can also serve as a form of nicotine replacement. But studies so far show that e-cigarettes aren't any better at helping you quit than other forms of nicotine replacement (like the patch or gum). More »

Lung cancer: Not just for smokers

A small but significant percentage of lung cancer deaths occur in nonsmokers. Research suggests that they may get a different form of the disease than do smokers, one that may respond better to certain medications. More »