Skin and Hair

Skin and Hair Articles

About face

Skin goes through many changes after a certain age. It becomes thinner, loses fat, and takes longer to heal. Depending on past sun exposure, skin also can get more wrinkles and dark spots than usual. Adopting a daily skin care routine that includes washing properly, applying moisturizer, and using adequate sunscreen, can help protect aging skin and keep it healthy. More »

Rosacea can flare at menopause

Rosacea is a skin condition that affects some 16 million Americans, causing persistent redness, pimples, and dilated blood vessels on the face. Flushing makes the condition worse, and it can be exacerbated by hot flashes at menopause. Doctors typically diagnose rosacea by performing a skin examination and taking a medical history. The condition is treatable by avoiding triggers and using medications to reduce redness and swelling. (Locked) More »

The body’s overlooked defense system

The skin is one of the body’s important defense systems. It keeps moisture in the body and protects the body from toxins in the water or air, ultraviolet rays, and bacteria. In older age, the skin becomes thinner and drier, and it is more prone to tearing and splitting, increasing the risk that germs can get inside the body. Petroleum jelly, creams, oils, and humectants can all help maintain a healthy skin barrier. They are most effective if applied right after hand washing or bathing. More »

On the spot

People who are diligent about sun protection can still develop skin spots, growths, or other abnormalities. While most spots and growths are benign, people should monitor anything new for two weeks to a month. If it’s still there, or has evolved in any way, like changes in size or colors, then get it checked by a dermatologist. More »

Eczema tied to higher bone fracture risk

A large study published in the February 2020 issue of The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology found that people with eczema had an increased bone fracture risk, especially if eczema was severe. More »

Are varicose veins a health risk?

Varicose veins aren’t typically considered a major health threat, but they are associated with a higher risk of leg swelling, blood clots, skin infections and ulcers. (Locked) More »

Bedsores (Decubitus Ulcers)

Bedsores, also called pressure ulcers or decubitus ulcers, are areas of broken skin that can develop in people who: Bedsores are common in people in hospitals and nursing homes and in people being cared for at home. Bedsores form where the weight of the person's body presses the skin against the firm surface of the bed. In people confined to bed, bedsores are most common over the hip, spine, lower back, tailbone, shoulder blades, elbows and heels. In people who use a wheelchair, bedsores tend to occur on the buttocks and bottoms of the feet. (Locked) More »