Men's Health Archive

Articles

Acupuncture for ED?

 

When sildenafil (Viagra) was introduced in 1998, it revolutionized the treatment of male sexual dysfunction. For one thing, this important but intensely personal issue came out from under the covers, as men began to approach sexual woes as medical problems, not personal failings. For another, the most common problem got a new and more accurate name, as erectile dysfunction (ED) replaced impotence, a term that's derived from the Latin for "loss of power." Above all, sildenafil and its rivals, vardenafil (Levitra) and tadalafil (Cialis), provide effective and safe treatment for about 70% of men with ED.

It's encouraging progress, but since some 18 million American men have ED, there are about six million who won't respond to the ED pills. Men who use nitrate medications for heart disease cannot even try ED pills, and some men have adverse reactions or simply do not want to use medication for ED. Other modern treatments are available, but since ED is an age-old problem, some gents prefer to try old remedies instead of new therapies.

Stretching exercises

Because stretching cold muscles can lead to injury, it’s best to stretch after your muscles have been adequately warmed up — either at the end of your workout or after you’ve completed your warm-up. Stretching at the end of your workout can be a good way to cool down. Stretch several times a week for […]

Exercise and erectile dysfunction (ED)

Emerging scientific evidence suggests that engaging in a few hours of exercise a week — including strength training, stretching, and balance exercises — may reduce the risk of erectile dysfunction (ED).

Exercise and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)

Researchers have found an inverse relationship between physical activity and BPH syptoms: simply put, men who are more physically active are less likely to suffer from symptoms of an enlarged prostate such as frequent urination, urgency, and a weak urinary stream.

Belly fat is the shape of cardiovascular risk

Extra fat that accumulates around the abdomen goes by many names: beer belly, spare tire, love handles, apple shape, middle-age spread, and the more technical “abdominal obesity.” No matter what the name, it is the shape of risk.

Mindfulness meditation improves connections in the brain

Mindfulness meditation can ease stress. It also seems to do a lot more, like help with physical and psychological problems from high blood pressure and chronic pain to anxiety and binge eating. New research shows that mindfulness meditation changes the way nerves connect.

PSA blood test for prostate cancer doesn’t save lives

Men have long been encouraged to have routine tests for prostate-specific antigen as a way to detect prostate cancer early. Although early detection should save lives, it doesn’t seem to work that way for slow-growing prostate cancer. The longest-running trial to date shows that PSA testing doesn’t help men live longer.

What is a PSA test?

Doctors use this test to screen for prostate cancer, but it does not provide a definitive diagnosis.

Bladder cancer: Men at risk

Genitourinary malignancies are a worry for men. In adolescents and young adults, testicular cancer is the main concern. One of the unappreciated benefits of growing older is that cancer of the testicles becomes rare — but as men outgrow that risk, they face the problem of prostate cancer. With these well-publicized diseases to head their worry list, it's easy for men to overlook bladder cancer — but that would be a mistake. In fact, about 53,000 American men will be diagnosed with the disease this year alone, and over 10,000 will die from it.

Bladder cancer is the fourth most common internal malignancy in American men; it is also one of the 10 deadliest cancers, and it saps our strapped economy of almost $3 billion a year. But there's good news, too. Early diagnosis can nip the disease in the bud, and new treatments are improving the outlook for patients with advanced disease. And when it comes to good news, you'll also be glad to know that you can take simple steps to reduce your risk of getting bladder cancer.

At Harvard Forum, experts debate how much vitamin D is enough

A panel discussion at Harvard School of Public Health called “Boosting Vitamin D: Not Enough or Too Much?” highlights the current controversy over the once-overlooked sunshine vitamin. A panel of experts assembled by the Institute of Medicine recommends a daily dose of 600 IU per day for everyone from ages 1 to 70 and 800 IU for those over 70. Other experts think the IOM recommendation is too low. One way to get vitamin D is to spend a few minutes a day outside in the sun, but that’s a hot-button issue because sun exposure is a cause of skin cancer.

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