Men's Health Archive

Articles

Unlocking the mystery of chronic pelvic pain syndrome

The condition is an all-too-real problem for men, and one of the more difficult to treat.

After age 50, men often have periods of discomfort "down there." It could be a cramping, aching, or throbbing pain in and around your pelvis and genitals. You also may have issues in the bedroom and bathroom. While the problems are real, the cause is often difficult to pinpoint.

It's called chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) — also known as chronic prostatitis — and it's one of the most puzzling and difficult-to-manage conditions for older men.

7 strategies for partnering up with ED

Men who have erectile dysfunction are often embarrassed and are reluctant to talk about their condition. But significant others can help by offering much-needed support in a number of ways.

Plant protein may help you live longer

In the journals

Men need sufficient protein to help maintain muscle mass and strength as they age. A study published online July 13, 2020, by JAMA Internal Medicine suggests the source of that protein also may dictate how long they live. Scientists examined the diets of more than 400,000 people ages 50 and older, who consumed protein from plant sources, red meat, and eggs. They were then followed for more than 16 years. Those who ate mostly plant protein instead of red meat or egg protein had a 13% to 24% lower risk of death from any cause.

How much plant protein is enough? The researchers found that men in particular had a 12% lower risk of death for every 10 grams of plant protein per 1,000 calories they consumed. The experts suggested that the benefits could increase if men ate even more plant protein. Guidelines recommend that healthy older adults need 1.2 grams of daily protein for every kilogram of body weight. A 175-pound man would need about 95 grams. Good sources of plant protein include almonds (about 17 grams per 1/2 cup), tofu (20 grams per cup), lentils (about 18 grams per cup), and black beans and chickpeas (15 grams per cup).

Get back in sexual sync

Here's how to regain romantic rhythm with your partner when sexual drive and interest get out of whack.

It's common for longtime partners to fall into romantic ruts. "You don't stay newlyweds for life, and there are times when romance and sex get routine and less exciting," says Dr. Sharon Bober, director of the Sexual Health Program at Harvard-affiliated Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

What can you do when you and your partner are sexually out of sync? As with most things in life, if you want change, then you must be willing to change.

Talking to your doctor about an abusive relationship

Intimate partner violence can occur between people of any gender or sexual orientation. Abuse can leave people feeling isolated, confused, or hopeless, and talking to a health professional is one way to get help in the form of medical treatment or access to appropriate services.

Speaking up about orgasms

Men often don't talk about delayed or absent orgasm. Still, these issues can have a profound impact on their sex life.

Erectile dysfunction continues to be the main sex-related issue among older men. Yet, two other problems also can arise with age: anorgasmia, the inability to achieve an orgasm during sex, and delayed orgasm, in which it takes longer than usual to reach orgasm and ejaculate despite proper stimulation. Men can experience either one or both.

While these conditions can cause stress for both men and their sexual partners, they don't have to hinder a healthy, active sex life.

6 all-natural sex tips for men

Erectile dysfunction (ED) medications are relatively safe and work for most men, but they aren’t right for every man. Here are six proven strategies that can help –– and offer added benefits on overall health and quality of life.

Does human growth hormone slow the aging process?

Contrary to its reputation as an anti-aging supplement, human growth hormone is not effective at turning back the clock, and it may carry health risks. Commitment to a healthy diet and regular exercise is still the best formula for healthy aging.

The no-drug approach to erectile dysfunction

There are ways to manage ED without medication.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the more common health issues older men face, especially those with cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Some estimates suggest between 50% and 70% of men ages 50 to 70 experience mild to moderate ED.

ED is defined as difficulty achieving or sustaining an erection. It is often caused by a combination of physical and emotional issues. ED makes intercourse difficult, which can lower sex drive and desire, increase anxiety and depression, and affect a man's relationship with his partner.

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