Lung Health & Disease

Lung Health & Disease Articles

Cracking the cough code

Coughs can indicate different types of underlying conditions. Wet coughs that produce sputum are associated with postnasal drip, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, and nontuberculous mycobacteria infection. A dry cough (no sputum) is typically a reaction to something irritating the throat, such as a pollutant in the air, or certain conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease. A cough that sounds like a seal’s bark may be caused by infection or a disease. A cough marked by a whooping sound signals pertussis. (Locked) More »

What causes acute bronchitis?

Acute bronchitis is usually caused by a viral infection. It’s an inflammation of the breathing tubes in the lungs that causes a cough and sometimes pain in the chest. The cough can be dry or wet. A wet cough expels material from the lungs: mucus and sometimes white blood cells from the inflammation. Treatment typically involves medicine to suppress a cough. Antibiotics or antiviral drugs usually are not prescribed, since acute bronchitis resolves on its own. (Locked) More »

Something in the air

Exposure to particulate matter from air pollution has been shown to increase inflammatory markers in the bloodstream and oxidative stress, which are associated with a higher risk of heart disease, heart attacks, and strokes. People can protect themselves by avoiding high-pollution areas, restricting their time outside when air quality is poor, and exercising indoors when necessary. (Locked) More »

Understanding COPD from a cardiovascular perspective

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) includes damage to the air sacs of the lungs (emphysema) and inflammation in the lung’s airways (bronchitis). Some of the symptoms of COPD, such as trouble breathing, fatigue, and chest tightness during physical activity, may be mistakenly attributed to heart disease. Smoking increases the risk of both heart disease and COPD. Current or former smokers should consider getting tested for COPD with a simple lung function test known as spirometry. More »

What's that chest pain?

The big fear about chest pain is that it’s the result of a heart attack. Symptoms can include pressure or squeezing in the chest, lightheadedness, and pain in the shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back. However, chest pain can have any number of causes, such as heartburn, a panic attack, an overuse injury that inflames the chest wall, or a lung condition. Chest pain that is sudden or severe warrants a call to 911. If it’s been going on for months, it’s probably okay to be evaluated at a doctor’s office instead of the emergency department. (Locked) More »

Breathing life into your lungs

By age 65, the average man has typically lost up to a liter of lung capacity compared with when he was younger. However, it is possible for a person to preserve lung function and maybe even slow its natural decline by consuming more antioxidant-rich fruits; adopting weight training to improve the core, back, and posture; and getting proper vaccinations to protect against respiratory infections. (Locked) More »

B vitamins may raise risk of lung cancer in men who smoke

High dosages of vitamin B6 and B12 supplements were associated with three to four times the lung cancer risk in male smokers compared with smokers who did not use the vitamins. However, men who quit smoking for at least 10 years prior to the study, and also took the high dosages of the B vitamins, did not have a higher risk of lung cancer. More »

Air pollution: A threat to your heart and longevity?

Air pollution can trigger heart attacks, strokes, and irregular heart rhythms, especially in people who already have or who are at risk for heart disease. Tiny particles (known as PM2.5) spewed from power plants, factories, and vehicles seem to be the most dangerous to health. These particles pass thought the lungs into the circulation, activating immune cells involved with the creation of artery-clogging plaque inside arteries. To limit air pollution exposure, people should avoid exercising outdoors near busy roads and industrial areas. (Locked) More »