Lung Health & Disease

Lung Health & Disease Articles

B vitamins may raise risk of lung cancer in men who smoke

High dosages of vitamin B6 and B12 supplements were associated with three to four times the lung cancer risk in male smokers compared with smokers who did not use the vitamins. However, men who quit smoking for at least 10 years prior to the study, and also took the high dosages of the B vitamins, did not have a higher risk of lung cancer. More »

Air pollution: A threat to your heart and longevity?

Air pollution can trigger heart attacks, strokes, and irregular heart rhythms, especially in people who already have or who are at risk for heart disease. Tiny particles (known as PM2.5) spewed from power plants, factories, and vehicles seem to be the most dangerous to health. These particles pass thought the lungs into the circulation, activating immune cells involved with the creation of artery-clogging plaque inside arteries. To limit air pollution exposure, people should avoid exercising outdoors near busy roads and industrial areas. (Locked) More »

Are you at risk for COPD?

COPD includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, severe asthma, or a combination of these conditions. They cause inflammation, destruction or abnormal repair of airways and lung tissue, which reduces airflow. Even though most cases of COPD are linked to smoking, about a fifth of all cases are linked to other causes, such as poorly controlled asthma, abnormal lung development, and air pollution. Treatment may involve inhaled medications to reduce inflammation and to open the airways, antibiotics, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation (exercise, education, and support), and surgical or nonsurgical procedures to improve lung function. More »

As an ex-smoker, am I still at high risk for lung cancer?

Quitting smoking is the best health move any person can make. Improved lung function and lower heart attack risk can happen almost immediately after someone quits smoking, but it takes more than 10 years of not smoking to see a dramatic decrease in cancer risk. (Locked) More »

What to do for bronchitis

Although bronchitis may last up to three weeks, it usually doesn’t warrant antibiotics or medical treatment. Rest, fluids, acetaminophen for pain, nonprescription cough remedies, and steam therapy can ease symptoms. (Locked) More »

Battling breathlessness

Shortness of breath is one of the most common problems people bring to their doctors. The most obvious causes such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and coronary artery disease are relatively easy to uncover with a battery of standard tests. For some people, however, the source of the problem remains frustratingly elusive. Advanced cardiopulmonary testing that measures heart and lung function during exercise can often provide answers. (Locked) More »

Emphysema

Emphysema is a respiratory disease that makes it hard to breathe. Normally, when you take a breath, air travels from your nose and mouth through your windpipe and into the bronchi. These are small air passages that branch off into each lung. The bronchi branch further into thousands of smaller, thinner tubes that end in grape-like clusters of small, round air sacs called alveoli.  Tiny blood vessels absorb oxygen from the air through the walls of the alveoli and deliver it to cells throughout the body. Carbon dioxide moves in the opposite direction. It passes out of the bloodstream, back into the alveoli, and is then eliminated from the body when you breathe out. More »