Wait-and-see approaches to prostate cancer

Two of the more popular options now for managing low-risk prostate cancer are active surveillance and watchful waiting, during which therapy is not done right away. Monitoring prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels for changes and having routine digital rectal exams are the foundation for active surveillance. Watchful waiting is often for men ages 70 and older and doesn’t require any PSA testing or rectal exams, but instead postpones treatment unless significant symptoms develop. (Locked) More »

How many eggs can I safely eat?

More recent studies show that the average healthy person suffers no harm from eating up to seven eggs per week. Eggs also are a nutritious food. They are relatively low in calories and saturated fat, and rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals. (Locked) More »

When do I need an imaging test for my back pain?

Unless people have other symptoms in addition to low back pain, like a fever or leg weakness, an immediate x-ray, CT scan, or MRI rarely improves the outcome. A commonsense approach often works best, such as rest, hot and cold compresses, and over-the-counter pain relivers. (Locked) More »

Getting a grip on hand osteoarthritis

The risk of hand osteoarthritis increases with age and can cause joint pain and stiffness that affects a person’s ability to effectively grasp and hold objects. It’s not possible to reverse hand osteoarthritis, or even slow its progression in most cases. Strategies to help manage flare-ups, include over-the-counter medications, hot and cold compresses, braces and splints, and hand physical therapy. More »

Give your heart health a lift

Cardio exercise may help improve many aspects of heart health, such as lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, reduce plaque buildup to improve blood flow, and help maintain a healthy weight. But if people cannot meet the 150 minutes of recommended weekly aerobic activity, new research suggests that weight training for just an hour per week can be just as effective for protecting against heart attacks and strokes. (Locked) More »

Shining a light on winter depression

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that occurs during the late fall and early winter, with lack of natural light cited as the main contributor. Adopting light therapy, which involves exposure from a light box for about 30 minutes a day, can help restore the brain chemical imbalances that contribute to SAD. More »

A check on blood pressure

A man’s blood pressure is one of the easiest and simplest measurements and can tell much about his current and possible future health. New guidelines have suggested a lower threshold for normal blood pressure in all adults. Getting blood pressure checked by one’s doctor and monitoring it on a regular basis at home can help people note any significant changes and whether they need to alter lifestyle behaviors or take medication. (Locked) More »

Blood test may find early signs of Alzheimer's

A new study found that a simple blood test can detect beta-amyloid protein buildup—one of the possible causes of Alzheimer’s disease—years before symptoms appear. The test is expected to be available to the public in a few years. More »

Eating more nuts may improve sexual function

A recent study found that men who added 60 grams — about ½ cup or 360 calories—of a nut mixture made from almonds, hazelnuts, and walnuts to their daily diet was associated with improvement in several aspects of their sexual life. More »