Transforming the treatment of diabetes

A program that uses a smartphone app and telemedicine to provide frequent virtual office visits for people with diabetes may help them manage their disease more effectively. People in the program also receive a glucose monitor to test their blood sugar and use the app to send their results to a cloud-based server, where clinicians can review the results. The app also provides detailed lifestyle intervention plans, including an animated figure that demonstrates exercises and menus that include common foods that people eat everyday but with less carbohydrate, more protein, and smaller portions. More »

Choosing an appropriate heart test

People with stable angina (chest pain that occurs during certain activities and goes away with rest) may be evaluated with a number of different tests. The choice depends the doctor’s level of suspicion that the person has coronary artery disease. (Locked) More »

The right way to "do lunch"

More than half of employed Americans who usually eat lunch on the job find it hard to eat a healthy lunch. One cafeteria-based study found that labeling foods with “traffic light” symbols that reflect their health value helped customers make better choices. They were less likely to choose “red light” foods, which were higher in fat and calories, and more likely to choose “green light” foods, which featured fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, or low-fat dairy as the main ingredient. Such healthy options for lunch may include garden (veggie) burgers and premade salads. (Locked) More »

Why you should care about your core

Core muscles—which include those in the abdomen, back, sides, pelvis, and buttocks—are important for many sports, including golfing, tennis, biking, and swimming. A strong core may also prevent falls and other injuries that may derail exercise efforts. The best exercises to strengthen core muscles include those that target several groups of muscles at a time. The plank, for example, builds muscles in the abdomen, back, and side. More »

Protect your heart, preserve your mind?

People who have a heart attack or angina (chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart) may face a faster drop in thinking skills than people who don’t experience those heart-related problems. The underlying cause of this long-observed connection between the heart and brain is not exactly clear. But high blood pressure and other factors that damage arteries to the heart may also harm vessels in the brain. Regular exercise, along with controlling other risk factors for heart disease—especially high blood pressure—may help prevent cognitive decline. (Locked) More »

Legume of the month: Peas

Fresh peas are considered starchy vegetables by the U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Dried, split green peas similar to other beans  are classified as legumes. More »

The trouble with watching too much TV

Sitting while watching TV may be more detrimental to heart health than sitting while at work. But getting the recommended levels of physical activity may protect against watching more than four hours of TV daily. More »