Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most common painful and non-life-threatening conditions. It affects four in five Americans at some point in their lives. The good news is that back pain need not govern how you live your life.

If you have back pain, medication, exercise, and changes in your lifestyle are likely to offer the most relief. Surgery is useful in a minority of people

Most back pain isn't dangerous, but it's important to learn the "red flag" situations that require immediate medical attention. These include:

  • back pain that occurs at the same time as a fever
  • leg weakness that comes on abruptly or gets progressively worse
  • numbness in the groin
  • loss of bowel or bladder control
  • pain that worsens instead of getting better
  • inability to find a comfortable position for sitting or sleeping during times when you feel back pain

Other self-care steps you can take to mend your back include different types of exercise and complementary therapies such as chiropractic care, acupuncture, and massage, as well as choosing the right mattress.

Back Pain Articles

Using acupuncture for pain relief

Image: AGL_Photography/iStock The ancient art of acupuncture has been practiced for centuries in Asia and has more recently spread to the United States and other Western countries. According to traditional Chinese beliefs, acupuncture works by affecting the flow of energy (called qi or chi), through 12 channels, or meridians, that run lengthwise through the body. Acupuncture involves the insertion of extremely fine needles into the skin at specific "acupoints" along the meridians. This action, some scientific evidence has shown, may result in pain relief by releasing endorphins, the body's natural painkilling chemicals, and may affect the part of the brain that governs serotonin levels, the brain transmitter involved with mood. More »

Prescription pain pills: Worth the risks?

Opioids are powerful painkillers that block messages of pain to the brain and decrease the body's perception of discomfort. But taking opioids for four weeks or longer puts a person at risk for dependence and sometimes for addiction. (Locked) More »

Sciatica: Of all the nerve

Sciatica affects as many as 40% of people during their lives. While attacks can vary in terms of severity, duration, and frequency, you can take measures to manage the pain and prevent future episodes. (Locked) More »

Low back pain attacks: One pill may be enough

Adding muscle relaxers or narcotic pain relievers to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) naproxen (Aleve) did not improve pain or function for people who went to emergency rooms seeking help for severe low back pain. More »

Three steps to build a better back

Brisk walking works many muscles that support a strong and healthy back, such as the muscles in the thighs, calves, abdomen, hips, and buttocks.  Image: Thinkstock Strengthening, stretching, and improving posture will go a long way toward reducing back pain that comes with age. (Locked) More »

Physical therapy as good as surgery for common spine-related back pain

Surgery and intensive physical therapy each produce similar relief for spinal stenosis, or back pain caused by narrowing of the space around the spinal nerves. Surgery has risks, but physical therapy requires more effort. The choice comes down to personal preference. Some men may find surgical risks acceptable in exchange for the chance of immediate relief; other men may prefer to give physical therapy a try first. Research suggests that the physical therapy must be relatively rigorous to be effective. (Locked) More »