Can you eat away at your cancer risk?

Research has found that certain foods are protective against cancer, while others are associated with higher cancer risk. Fruits and vegetables might be among those that reduce risk, while processed meats and fast food are among those to avoid. In addition, maintaining a healthy weight and getting regular physical activity might help a person avoid cancer. (Locked) More »

Strategies to manage surgical pain

Taking opioid medications after surgery can lead to problems, including addiction, and should be avoided when possible. Taking nonprescription pain relievers; recognizing a certain amount of discomfort as normal; and adopting non-medication pain relief methods, such as icing after surgery, can reduce the need for opioid pain medications. (Locked) More »

Past trauma may haunt your future health

 Image: © Giuda90/Getty Images A rocky childhood. A violent assault. A car accident. If these are in your past, they could be affecting your present health. These are all examples of traumatic events — which, in psychological terms, are incidents that make you believe you are in danger of being seriously injured or losing your life, says Andrea Roberts, a research scientist with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Research shows that these events can trigger emotional and even physical reactions that can make you more prone to a number of different health conditions, including heart attack, stroke, obesity, diabetes, and cancer. (Locked) More »

Heart palpitations: Mostly harmless

Heart palpitations are common heart rhythm disturbances. Most often people experiencing them feel a sensation like the heart is flip-flopping, skipping beats, or racing. If someone experiences these symptoms alone it typically doesn’t signal a problem, but if they are persistent or are accompanied by dizziness, weakness, or fainting, they should be checked out by a doctor. (Locked) More »