Looking for early signs of Alzheimer’s

For a long time, memory loss was seen as the telltale sign of Alzheimer’s disease, but this is not necessarily the best way to identify the disease in its earliest stages. In fact, it is now believed that Alzheimer’s-related changes begin in the brain at least a decade before common symptoms emerge. The goal now is to find multiple markers and use a consolidated effort in hopes of diagnosing the disease as early as possible. More »

Which is best for optimal sun protection — sprays or lotions?

Spray sunscreens help cover hard-to-reach areas, but they do have potential health concerns from inhaling their chemicals. The FDA has not specifically determined the health risks of inhaling sunscreen sprays, but recently advised not to use them near your face. People are probably better off using a lotion or gel. More »

When does long-term acid reflux become a serious issue?

Long-term acid reflux can damage the esophagus and may lead to a condition known as Barrett’s esophagus, which is a precursor to esophageal cancer and affects about 3% to 10% of older men. If symptoms appear, such as food sticking in the throat, weight loss, or pain from swallowing, an upper endoscopy may be recommended to help diagnose Barrett’s. More »

Stop diabetes before it begins

An estimated one out of three American adults is prediabetic, which means blood sugar levels are higher than normal but below the threshold for type 2 diabetes. Yet 90% of these people do not realize they are in this dangerous gray zone. Seeing a doctor to determine if any of the common risk factors exists and getting blood sugar levels checked to determine if you have prediabetes are the first steps to stopping type 2 diabetes from occurring. (Locked) More »

The finer points of acupuncture

The ancient practice of acupuncture has been used to help heal and manage ailments such as chronic pain, low back pain, and arthritis. The treatment involves inserting hair-thin needles into specific points on the body to help release energy that may be blocked because of illness or other imbalances. While the supporting research is ongoing and mixed, men may benefit from the treatment either by itself or as part of traditional pain therapy. (Locked) More »

Stay healthy at the hospital

: Whether people go in for surgery, testing, or an outpatient procedure, a hospital stay can pose further health risks. While potential risks depend in part on why someone has to go into the hospital and the facility itself, there are steps a person can take to minimize risk, especially when it comes to developing hospital-acquired infections that can lead to a longer hospital stay or readmission. (Locked) More »

Take a swing at racket sports

Racket sports like tennis, squash, badminton, racquetball, Ping-Pong, and other variations are the ideal exercise for many older men. Besides offering a good cardiovascular workout, they can help with both upper- and lower-body strength at once, can be modified to fit any age or fitness level, and do not involve a lot of equipment. (Locked) More »

Reducing dietary salt may mean fewer nighttime bathroom trips

Men who battle with nocturia—waking up at night to urinate—may find relief by reducing the amount of salt in their diet. People who lowered their daily salt intake from 10.7 grams to 8 grams reduced their average nighttime frequency of urination by almost 50%—from 2.3 times to 1.4 times. More »