The heart attack gender gap

Heart attacks strike men at younger ages than women. But survival rates are worse in women. Why?

Published: April, 2016

heart attack gender gap
Compared with men, women are less likely to recognize and act upon the symptoms of a heart attack.
Image: zaganDesign/Thinkstock

Imagine someone in the throes of a heart attack. If you picture a man clutching his chest in agony, that's understandable. At younger ages, men face a greater risk of heart disease than women. On average, a first heart attack—the most common manifestation of this prevalent disease—strikes men at age 65. For women, the average age of a first heart attack is 72.

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