Atrial fibrillation: Shifting strategies for early treatment?

For people recently diagnosed, taming the heart's rhythm rather than slowing it down may be a better approach.

Published: January, 2021

The heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation (afib) occurs when the heart's electrical system goes awry. Instead of the heart's natural pacemaker creating a steady beat, the heart's upper chambers (atria) pulsate rapidly — up to hundreds of times per minute. Most of the electrical impulses telling the lower chambers (ventricles) to contract don't get through but many do, triggering a racing, irregular heartbeat that can leave people dizzy, breathless, or fatigued.

Therapies to tackle this common arrhythmia have improved over the years. Now, new findings suggest it may be time to rethink the treatment for people newly diagnosed with afib (see "Afib: Rhythm vs. rate control").

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