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Tight blood sugar control in type 2 diabetes linked to fewer heart attacks and strokes

diabetes
Published: June 04, 2015
  • Author: Urmila Parlikar,

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Comments

Chusnul
June 09, 2015

This nice article, because I know abaout Tight Blood Sugar

Dr. Sunny Sharma
June 08, 2015

Very informative article, It shows a lot of facts and admiring content.

Prashant Pandey
June 06, 2015

Thanks for sharing information it will help lots of people to get aware.

Sara
June 05, 2015

I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2014. I started the ADA diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn’t right and began to do a lot of research. On April 13th I found this book on wje592.com/i-am-finally-free-of-diabetes/. I read the book from end to end that night because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100, the next day was in the 90’s and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70’s and the 80’s. My doctor took me off the metformin after just one week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds in a month. I now work out twice a day and still have tons of energy. I have lost 6+ inches around my waist and I am off my high blood pressure medication too. I have about 20 more pounds to go till my body finds its ideal weight. The great news is, this is a lifestyle I can live with, it makes sense and it works. God Bless the writer. I wish the ADA would stop enabling consumers and tell them the truth. You can get off the drugs, you can help yourself, but you have to have a correct lifestyle and diet. No more processed foods.

Mary Patterson
June 05, 2015

Tight blood sugar is benefit for a lot of diseases. I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2014. I started the ADA diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn’t right and began to do a lot of research. I read the book from end to end that night because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100, the next day was in the 90’s and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70’s and the 80’s. My doctor took me off the metformin after just one week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds in a month. I now work out twice a day and still have tons of energy. I have lost 6+ inches around my waist and I am off my high blood pressure medication too. I have about 20 more pounds to go till my body finds its ideal weight. The great news is, this is a lifestyle I can live with, it makes sense and it works. God Bless the writer. I wish the ADA would stop enabling consumers and tell them the truth. You can get off the drugs, you can help yourself, but you have to have a correct lifestyle and diet. No more processed foods.

Anthony cusano
June 05, 2015

So, intensive therapy reduces the number of cardiovascular events, but causes deaths from both CV disease and all causes by some other problems. The conclusion is that reducing blood sugar is a good thing, but using poisons (all medications technically poison bodily processes) is the wrong way to do it. We physicians need to end our love affair with poisons, and enable our patients to reduce CV risk factors the natural way, i.e. by diet and exercise. Just because we suck at doing that doesn’t mean we are right to use sorcery. All the poisons do in this case is reshuffle the deck so patients just die from different problems at the same rate, while big pharma and healthcare financing companies reap profits selling drugs or spending fewer premium dollars on patient care, respectively.

TopRazer - Razer
June 04, 2015

TopRazer

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