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Can celiac disease affect life expectancy?

celiac-disease
May 28, 2020

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Comments

Andy
June 3, 2020

At first, I took a popular DNA ancestry test with health checks for chromosomal Celiac Disease…the results said I was a “carrier” and at risk. I later-on took a blood test for (a battery of tests) and my blood came back positive for Celiac. I started to bleed and have an eczema neck rash, but the good news is that after two weeks of being gluten-free, these symptoms have gone away! I wish everyone a steadfast determination to stay gluten-free and eat European cheeses to “help your gut” with those enzymes. I found out that I mysteriously feel better after eating white cheddar cheeses, white mexican cheeze (queso) and by drinking lactose-free whole milk with omega-3. I also feel better after eating fajitas. I think it is the protein in them. I usually order a milk too. Afterwards, my stomach feels better. I believe that there are enzymes in these foods that heal my gut. I hope this helps you too.

DUANE HAYES
May 29, 2020

As one with Celiac, it’s crucial to NOT EAT GLUTEN! Be sure to pay attention, some packaged foods do not list any gluten, but it’s there. I enjoyed a packaged snack with nuts and fruits, not one of which was part gluten. Yet from the pain and attending problems I knew it was contaminated. Better off to make sure it says “Gluten free” Also better off is to eat foods that aren’t packaged, like vegetables, meat, fruits, nuts, etc.

Austin
May 29, 2020

10/10 article thank you; – I think certainly here in the uk, we ought to consider mass testing for gluten intolerance – the numbers found suffering climb and climb. If you don’t know, or don’t take the diet seriously, internal bleeding can be the result, which is where I was. Those who are hesitant to comply with being gluten free, can be reassured, that if you cook breads etc yourself, you end up preferring them – and, needing to eat less. Adding things like sunflower seeds helps on the catering front. My own thought is that overuse of gluten in the food industry has caused our allergy – food productions lines use it in countless ways, including on food production machine belts etc.

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