Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.


Diseases & Conditions Articles

Atrial fibrillation: The latest treatment trends

More than one in six ischemic strokes can be traced to an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation (afib). Blood-thinning drugs are typically used to prevent clot formation, but these carry risks of their own. Doctors now have newer and better drug and device options to help lessen afib stroke risk for more people. (Locked) More »

Concern about recurring hiccups

Hiccups are often caused by many everyday situations, including distention of the stomach (which can be the result of overeating), swallowing air, or drinking carbonated beverages. They usually go away on their own, but episodes that last longer than 48 hours could be a sign of certain medical problems.  (Locked) More »

Too much of a good thing?

Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are used to treat a variety of gastrointestinal problems, are the third most popular drug in the United States. But recent studies show their constant use may be linked to an increased risk of heart attack, fractures, and dementia. This has shed light on the potential dangers of long-term medication, especially those like PPIs that help to manage an ongoing condition.  (Locked) More »

Ask the doctor: Ongoing treatment for atrial fibrillation

A single episode of atrial fibrillation (afib) increases a person’s risk of stroke, even after the heart’s rhythm returns to normal. As a result, doctors may advise people with afib to take anti-clotting drugs indefinitely to lower stroke risk.  (Locked) More »

Constipation: A connection to heart disease?

Chronic constipation has been linked to a slightly higher risk of dying of cardiovascular disease. One possible explanation: infrequent bowel movements lead to straining, which can raise blood pressure, stressing the heart and blood vessels. Many medications (especially painkillers) can promote constipation. Eating more fiber, drinking plenty of fluids, and getting regular exercise can help.  (Locked) More »

Cancer survivors may face cardiovascular complications

Many cancer-suppressing treatments, including chemotherapy, radiation, and newer targeted therapies, can have undesirable effects on the heart and blood vessels. Those at greatest risk include people treated during childhood or after age 65, as well as people who have recurrent cancer and other risk factors for heart disease. Cancer survivors should stay vigilant for new cardiovascular symptoms during and after treatment and report them right away to their primary care doctor or oncologist.  (Locked) More »

Shaking off shingles

One in three adults is predicted to get shingles at some point. It is essential to seek immediate medical attention, as untreated shingles can increase your risk for chronic pain, blindness, and other long-term health problems, including cardiovascular problems. (Locked) More »

The best ways to treat spider veins

There are two common treatments for spider veins. Sclerotherapy is better for larger veins but involves needles and injections. Laser therapy can be as effective for smaller veins, but it may result in loss of skin pigment, especially in darker-skinned individuals.  (Locked) More »