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You can't buy good health but you can buy good health information. Check out these newly released Special Health Reports from Harvard Medical School:

Tanning beds pose same skin cancer risk as tanning in the sun, reports Harvard Women's Health Watch

Whether it comes from the sun or from artificial sources such as sun lamps and tanning beds, ultraviolet radiation is linked to skin cancers and to other sorts of skin damage, particularly premature skin aging, reports the September 2009 issue of Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

Ultraviolet radiation is one part of the spectrum of light that reaches the earth from the sun. The longer ultraviolet rays (UVA), which penetrate deep into the skin, are responsible for tanning. Shorter rays (UVB) damage superficial skin cell layers, causing sunburn. Tanning beds use fluorescent bulbs that emit mostly UVA, with smaller doses of UVB. The amount of UVA radiation emitted in a tanning bed is up to three times more intense than the UVA in natural sunlight, and the UVB intensity in tanning beds approaches that of bright sunlight.

There's mounting evidence of a link between tanning bed use and all skin cancers. In 2002, a study found that use of an indoor tanning device was associated with a 50% increase in the risk of basal cell carcinoma and a more than 100% increase in the risk of squamous cell carcinoma. In 2007, an international cancer research organization found that people who started indoor tanning before age 35 had a 75% greater risk of developing melanoma, a serious and sometimes life-threatening cancer.

Harvard Women’s Health Watch notes that despite the clear evidence that it’s unsafe, the use of tanning beds is on the rise. The tanning industry claims that tanning is a good way to stimulate the skin’s production of vitamin D, which is essential to bone health and has also been linked to a reduced risk for some cancers. But supplements can easily provide sufficient vitamin D, without any risks to skin health.

Read the full-length article: "Is a tanning bed safer than sunlight?"

Also in this issue of the Harvard Women's Health Watch

  • Botox: Beyond cosmetic fixes
  • Anaphylaxis: An overwhelming allergic reaction
  • In the journals: Link found between migraines with aura and late-life brain lesions in women
  • In the journals: Soy extracts don't improve bone density in older women
  • In the journals: Endometrial ablation is shown to be safe and effective
  • By the way, doctor: Is a tanning bed safer than sunlight?

More Harvard Health News »


About Harvard Health Publications

Harvard Health Publications publishes four monthly newsletters--Harvard Health Letter, Harvard Women's Health Watch, Harvard Men's Health Watch, and Harvard Heart Letter--as well as more than 50 special health reports and books drawing on the expertise of the 8,000 faculty physicians at Harvard Medical School and its world-famous affiliated hospitals.