Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Can I reverse prediabetes?

Prediabetes can be reversed in some cases through lifestyle changes, such as an improved diet, increased exercise, and modest weight loss of 5% to 7% of body weight. (Locked) More »

Eating more nuts may improve sexual function

A recent study found that men who added 60 grams — about ½ cup or 360 calories—of a nut mixture made from almonds, hazelnuts, and walnuts to their daily diet was associated with improvement in several aspects of their sexual life. More »

How many eggs can I safely eat?

More recent studies show that the average healthy person suffers no harm from eating up to seven eggs per week. Eggs also are a nutritious food. They are relatively low in calories and saturated fat, and rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals. (Locked) More »

Keep your health habits on track during the holidays

The holiday season is a busy time of year when many people let their good exercise habits and diet slip. Planning ahead for the season can help people stay on track. Some strategies to help maintain good health habits include tracking your fitness and diet, focusing on social connections instead of food and drink at parties, and looking for new, interesting workouts. (Locked) More »

Legume of the month: Chickpeas

Also known as garbanzo beans, chickpeas are featured in an array of dishes throughout the world, including Africa, India, the Middle East, and Europe. Several studies have found that eating chickpeas may improve cholesterol levels and reduce blood sugar. (Locked) More »

Comfort food without the guilt

To reduce dietary risks of comfort foods, it’s best to swap out unhealthy ingredients with healthier alternatives. For example, one could ditch full-fat dairy products like cream and butter, and instead use nonfat Greek yogurt or skim milk; ditch red meat in favor of poultry, fish, or legumes; ditch salt and use herbs and spices, such as oregano, rosemary, or basil; or ditch refined-grain noodles and use noodles made of whole wheat, black beans, lentils, or zucchini. (Locked) More »

Don't give up on grains

Many people are opting for low-carb diets and cutting out grains as a result. But when they do, they might be missing out on the nutritional benefits whole grains can bring. Whole grains are not only nutrient-rich but also contain fiber and cancer-fighting plant chemicals, known as phytochemicals. To eat more, try different varieties, including brown rice, barley, steel-cut oats, and quinoa. (Locked) More »

Is your lunch lacking?

Many Americans are in search of a healthier lunch, according to a study. People reported that it can be difficult to make good choices because they’re not always convenient, tasty, or readily available. More »

The trouble with excess salt

There’s been some disagreement in the scientific community about how much salt in the diet is too much. But most long-term studies show that excess sodium can raise blood pressure in many people and people’s hearts are typically healthier when they eat less sodium. Ideally, people should stick to less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium a day. (Locked) More »