Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Getting your five a day

Research has consistently shown that eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. However, many men have trouble reaching this daily quota. To achieve this goal, it’s best to focus on food quality and adding some fruits and vegetables to every meal and snacks. (Locked) More »

Simple swaps to eat less salt

The top 10 sources of sodium in the American diet include processed foods that contain several high-sodium ingredients, such as cheese and cured meats. Examples include pizza, sandwiches, and burritos and tacos. The leading source of sodium is bread and rolls, not because these foods are especially high in salt but because people eat them frequently. More »

The pros and cons of root vegetables

Root vegetables—like sweet potatoes, turnips, and parsnips—are often featured in vegetarian cuisines. They are low in calories and rich in vitamins and minerals. For example, the flesh of a medium baked sweet potato has only 103 calories and enough vitamin A—1,096 micrograms—to meet one’s entire Recommended Dietary Allowance for the day. But most root vegetables are also very high in carbohydrates and should be limited to one serving per day. Easy ways to eat root vegetables: boiled, mashed, baked, roasted with a little olive oil, or tossed into soups and casseroles. (Locked) More »

Vegetable of the month: Tomatoes

Eating tomatoes and tomato products may help lower cholesterol and improve blood vessel function. In addition, tomatoes are a good source of lycopene, an antioxidant that helps eliminate cell-damaging free radicals in the body. (Locked) More »

Fermented foods can add depth to your diet

Fermented foods, which are preserved using an age-old method, can provide health benefits if eaten regularly. Fermented foods containing live active cultures can help support a healthy gut microbiome, which helps to ensure that the lining of the intestines is strong and doesn’t allow digested material to leak out of the intestinal tract. This condition, called leaky gut syndrome, has been linked to a number of chronic diseases and health conditions. (Locked) More »

Small tricks to help you shed pounds and keep them off

Weight loss can be a major challenge today because of the abundance of food available and a more sedentary lifestyle. But there are strategies people can use to reach and maintain a healthy weight, including choosing eating patterns that are sustainable over the long term, adding in regular exercise, and focusing on restarting their efforts if they go off track. More »