Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Cracking coconut oil’s "health halo"

Coconut oil raises harmful LDL cholesterol (a well-known contributor to clogged arteries and heart disease) much more than other vegetable oils such as soybean, safflower, canola, and olive oils. More »

Seed of the month: Chia seeds

Chia seeds are the richest plant sources of omega-3 fatty acid and are also a good source of fiber. The small, black seeds don’t have much flavor, so they can be added to foods such as cereal or yogurt for a stealthy nutrient boost. More »

The no-drug approach to erectile dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the more common health issues older men face. ED drugs often are a standard solution, but they have their downsides, like possible side effects and over-dependency. In many cases, lifestyle changes like exercise, diet, and weight loss may slow the progress of ED and help manage it. More »

Time to try intermittent fasting?

Intermittent fasting—a diet that focuses on when rather than what a person eats—may be a good way to lose weight and improve cardiovascular health. One version, time-restricted feeding, involves eating only during a certain time window (usually eight hours) over a single day; another approach limits a person to just 400 to 600 calories daily for several days over the course of a week. The diet may reduce risk factors linked to heart disease, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, unhealthy blood lipid levels, and inflammation. (Locked) More »

What’s the healthiest way to brew coffee?

A study published online April 22, 2020, by the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found that drinking filtered coffee was better for health than drinking unfiltered coffee, particularly for older people. More »

10 healthy diet staples for your emergency food kit

When crafting an emergency supply of foods, one should avoid convenience foods like frozen dinners and canned soups, which typically contain excessive amounts of salt, fat, calories, preservatives, and added sugars. Better choices are healthy nonperishable items and frozen foods that can be used to make many meals. Experts recommend keeping a supply of a wide variety of vegetables, fruits, legumes, canned meats, whole grains, nuts and seeds, milks, healthy fats, soup stock, and seasonings. More »

Adopting a Mediterranean-style diet, one meal at a time

The Mediterranean diet is touted for its health benefits, which include a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and potentially even improvements to the gut bacteria, which may reduce harmful inflammation inside the body. Making some simple changes to your current diet can help improve your health. These include switching to olive oil as the primary fat, eating more whole grains and less processed food and sugar and reducing red meat consumption. Whenever possible, base your daily diet on a base of vegetables, fruits and plant-based options. (Locked) More »

Seed of the month: Quinoa

Although it’s classified as a seed, quinoa is usually eaten like a whole grain, as a side dish or added to salads and soups. Quinoa is rich in high-quality protein, making it a good choice for people trying to eat a more heart-friendly, plant-based diet. More »