Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Bit by bit, Americans are eating healthier

Americans appear to be eating higher amounts of high-quality carbohydrates, plant protein, and unsaturated fats. However, much of the American diet still seems to be coming from low-quality carbohydrates. More »

Gifts from the heart, for the heart

For people looking for holiday gift suggestions, many ideas—from kitchen gadgets to sessions with a personal trainer—may inspire healthy eating and exercise habits. Other examples include a fruit-of-the month subscription, a Mediterranean-inspired gift basket, a cookbook that highlights plant-based meals, a gym membership, home exercise equipment such as dumbbells, or a pass to a yoga studio or another exercise class. (Locked) More »

Is it safe to go vegan in older age?

The health benefits of all vegetarian diets are well documented: lower rates of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and cancer. But it’s unclear if a vegan diet, which excludes all animal products, has even greater health benefits than a less restrictive meatless diet, such as a diet that allows fish or eggs. Few studies compare vegetarian diets. However, it’s clear that the vegan diet carries risks for nutrient deficiency and is so restrictive that it can be difficult to maintain over the long term. More »

Can I reverse prediabetes?

Prediabetes can be reversed in some cases through lifestyle changes, such as an improved diet, increased exercise, and modest weight loss of 5% to 7% of body weight. (Locked) More »

Eating more nuts may improve sexual function

A recent study found that men who added 60 grams — about ½ cup or 360 calories—of a nut mixture made from almonds, hazelnuts, and walnuts to their daily diet was associated with improvement in several aspects of their sexual life. More »

Keep your health habits on track during the holidays

The holiday season is a busy time of year when many people let their good exercise habits and diet slip. Planning ahead for the season can help people stay on track. Some strategies to help maintain good health habits include tracking your fitness and diet, focusing on social connections instead of food and drink at parties, and looking for new, interesting workouts. More »

Legume of the month: Chickpeas

Also known as garbanzo beans, chickpeas are featured in an array of dishes throughout the world, including Africa, India, the Middle East, and Europe. Several studies have found that eating chickpeas may improve cholesterol levels and reduce blood sugar. More »