Energy & Fatigue

Energy & Fatigue Articles

A leg up on peripheral artery disease

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) occurs when the arteries carrying blood to the leg muscles have narrowed, almost always because of a buildup of fatty plaque. PAD can cause leg pain or fatigue after just a few minutes of walking or climbing stairs, and it increases a person’s risk for heart attack and stroke. Addressing risk factors, like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking, and adopting a regular walking program can help prevent PAD and manage symptoms if it occurs. (Locked) More »

Look out for Lyme

Summer is prime time for Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease in the United States. Common symptoms include a rash at the site of the tick bite, fever, chills, fatigue, and muscle and joint aches. People can protect themselves by properly treating their clothes before going outside, doing thorough body checks afterward, and removing attached ticks. Antibiotics such as doxycycline are very effective at killing the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. (Locked) More »

Losing steam? Avoid these energy zappers

Lifestyle habits may be to blame for some daily fatigue. For example, eating too much processed food can increase inflammation, which impairs the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)—the molecule that delivers energy to cells throughout the body. Getting too little sleep or being too stressed out all the time can increase levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which also reduces production of ATP. Eating a healthy diet, getting more sleep, and reducing stress can reduce fatigue. So can avoiding dehydration, exercising more, and staying socially connected. More »

When should you worry about fatigue?

Everyone goes through occasional bouts of fatigue, but an episode that becomes worse than usual or lasts longer than a week or two may be a sign of an underlying illness or infection and requires medical attention. More »

Shorter sleep may cause dehydration

Adults who sleep only six hours per night may have a higher chance of waking up dehydrated, compared with those who sleep longer. Besides getting more sleep, drinking at least one full glass of water upon waking up can help. More »

Refueling your energy levels

Everyone has the occasional low-energy day, but constant fatigue can make people less mentally and physically active, and diminish overall quality of life. To fight fatigue and increase your energy level, eat healthier foods, exercise regularly and be sure to get enough quality sleep. However, if you have unusual fatigue, it can be an early warning of a serious illness and should be checked out by a doctor. (Locked) More »

Tired of being fatigued

Regular fatigue should not be accepted as a normal part of aging. If fatigue appears suddenly or becomes more frequent, it could be related to several common conditions or lifestyle changes that require medical attention, such as anemia, heart disease, an under active thyroid, or depression, sleep apnea, or medication side effects. More »

How to keep your brain healthy through exercise

Exercise helps keep the brain healthy by improving memory and problem solving, and may even reduce the risk of dementia. Dr. Alvaro Pascual-Leone advocates regular exercise as a treatment for all people and explains more about the benefits for the brain. More »

When should you worry about fainting?

People who faint, or often feel like they’re going to faint, need medical attention. Fainting usually is caused by a temporary drop in blood pressure. Serious reasons for blood pressure to drop include internal bleeding, heart problems, and seizures. Less serious causes of fainting include stimulation of the vagus nerve, which can occur when straining while having a bowel movement (or, for men, passing urine), having blood drawn, getting an injection, hearing bad news, or even laughing too hard. More »