Depression

Sadness touches our lives at different times, but usually comes and goes. Depression, in contrast, often has enormous depth and staying power. It is more than a passing bout of "the blues." Depression can leave you feeling continuously burdened and can squash the joy you once got out of pleasurable activities.

When depression strikes, doctors usually probe what's going on in the mind and brain first. But it's also important to check what's going on in the body, since some medical problems are linked to mood disturbances. In fact, physical illnesses and medication side effects are behind up to 15% of all depression cases.

Depression isn't a one-size-fits-all illness. Instead, it can take many forms. Everyone's experience and treatment for depression is different. Effective treatments include talk therapy, medications, and exercise. Even bright light is used to treat a winter-onset depression known as seasonal affective disorder. Treatment can improve mood, strengthen connections with loved ones, and restore satisfaction in interests and hobbies.

New discoveries are helping improve our understanding of the biology of depression. These advances could pave the way for even more effective treatment with new drugs and devices. Better understanding of the genetics of depression could also usher in an era of personalized treatment.

Depression Articles

Anticholinergic drugs linked with dementia

Anticholinergic medications used to treat bladder conditions, Parkinson’s disease, and depression are associated with an increased risk of dementia, suggests a new study. People who got dementia had taken the medications for between four and 20 years, and the longer they took the drugs, the greater the risk. More »

Are you missing these signs of anxiety or depression?

Depression and anxiety are not a routine part of aging. But the signs of these conditions are sometimes brushed aside. Common symptoms include apathy, hopelessness, changes in sleeping or eating habits, persistent fatigue, difficulty focusing or making decisions, mood swings, unending worry, and wanting to be alone. If any of these symptoms are interfering in a person’s daily life, it may be time to reach out for help. Treatment ranges from medications and talk therapy to exercise and socializing. (Locked) More »

How meditation helps with depression

Depression continues to be a major health issue for older adults, affecting about 20% of adults ages 65 and older. Antidepressants and psychotherapy are the usual first-line treatments, but ongoing research has suggested that a regular meditation practice also can help by changing how the brain reacts to stress and anxiety, which are often the main triggers of depression. (Locked) More »

Lifting weights might lift your mood

A new study found that resistance training, such as weight lifting and exercises like push-ups, can reduce depression symptoms.  Longer and harder sessions did not provide any more symptom improvement compared to shorter and less vigorous workouts. More »

Sour mood getting you down? Get back to nature

Many men are at higher risk for mood disorders as they age, from dealing with sudden life changes like health issues, the loss of loved ones, and even the new world of retirement. If they do not want to turn to medication or therapy for help, men can find relief by interacting more with nature, whether by walking in the woods, listening to nature sounds, or even looking at pictures of soothing outdoor settings. More »

Food and mood: Is there a connection?

Researchers can’t say for sure whether your diet affects your depression risk, but adopting a Mediterranean diet has many other health benefits. The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains and healthy oils, and lean proteins, such as chicken and fish. More »

When the arrival of menopause brings symptoms of depression

The odds of experiencing symptoms of depression go up as women reach perimenopause and early postmenopause. Hormone therapy has been shown to help ward off these symptoms. But experts say despite the findings, hormone therapy should be used for prevention only in limited circumstances, because the treatment brings its own risks. More »

How to overcome grief’s health-damaging effects

Grieving over the death of a spouse, friend, or family member exposes people to many months of constant stress that can lead to anxiety, depression, trouble sleeping, and general aches and pains. This can place people at a greater risk for a heart attack, stroke, or even death, especially in the first few months of losing someone. Adopting several mind-body strategies designed to help lower and manage stress can help people get through the grieving process. (Locked) More »

Is your drinking becoming a problem?

Statistics show that drinking among older women is on the rise. Many women suffer from alcohol use disorder. Identifying and accepting it can lead to successful treatment. (Locked) More »