Depression

Sadness touches our lives at different times, but usually comes and goes. Depression, in contrast, often has enormous depth and staying power. It is more than a passing bout of "the blues." Depression can leave you feeling continuously burdened and can squash the joy you once got out of pleasurable activities.

When depression strikes, doctors usually probe what's going on in the mind and brain first. But it's also important to check what's going on in the body, since some medical problems are linked to mood disturbances. In fact, physical illnesses and medication side effects are behind up to 15% of all depression cases.

Depression isn't a one-size-fits-all illness. Instead, it can take many forms. Everyone's experience and treatment for depression is different. Effective treatments include talk therapy, medications, and exercise. Even bright light is used to treat a winter-onset depression known as seasonal affective disorder. Treatment can improve mood, strengthen connections with loved ones, and restore satisfaction in interests and hobbies.

New discoveries are helping improve our understanding of the biology of depression. These advances could pave the way for even more effective treatment with new drugs and devices. Better understanding of the genetics of depression could also usher in an era of personalized treatment.

Depression Articles

Feeling young could signal a younger brain

People who feel younger than their age scored higher on memory tests, rated themselves as healthy, and were less likely to have symptoms of depression compared with those who did not feel younger. More »

Strengthen your mood with weight training

Resistance training exercises aren’t just good for your body and your cardiovascular system. They might also boost mood, according to a new study. People who participated in resistance training between two or more days a week had fewer symptoms of depression than those who did not. (Locked) More »

Anticholinergic drugs linked with dementia

Anticholinergic medications used to treat bladder conditions, Parkinson’s disease, and depression are associated with an increased risk of dementia, suggests a new study. People who got dementia had taken the medications for between four and 20 years, and the longer they took the drugs, the greater the risk. More »

Are you missing these signs of anxiety or depression?

Depression and anxiety are not a routine part of aging. But the signs of these conditions are sometimes brushed aside. Common symptoms include apathy, hopelessness, changes in sleeping or eating habits, persistent fatigue, difficulty focusing or making decisions, mood swings, unending worry, and wanting to be alone. If any of these symptoms are interfering in a person’s daily life, it may be time to reach out for help. Treatment ranges from medications and talk therapy to exercise and socializing. (Locked) More »

How meditation helps with depression

Depression continues to be a major health issue for older adults, affecting about 20% of adults ages 65 and older. Antidepressants and psychotherapy are the usual first-line treatments, but ongoing research has suggested that a regular meditation practice also can help by changing how the brain reacts to stress and anxiety, which are often the main triggers of depression. (Locked) More »

Lifting weights might lift your mood

A new study found that resistance training, such as weight lifting and exercises like push-ups, can reduce depression symptoms.  Longer and harder sessions did not provide any more symptom improvement compared to shorter and less vigorous workouts. More »