Cold & Flu

Cold & Flu Articles

Common ways to fight the common cold

While there is no cure for the common cold, there are plenty of remedies, such as zinc lozenges, vitamin C, and even old-fashioned chicken soup. Taking them at the first onset of symptoms like a scratchy throat, stuffy nose, and achiness may reduce the severity and duration of cold symptoms. While the science is somewhat mixed on their effectiveness, experts suggest there is often little harm in trying them. (Locked) More »

Got a cold? Try some honey

A review of studies published Aug. 18, 2020, by BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine suggests that consuming honey appears to improve upper respiratory tract infection symptoms and in some cases shorten the duration of symptoms by a day or two. More »

Should I get a flu shot this year?

This year, getting a flu shot is more important than ever, because it can not only protect people against the flu, but will also reduce the burden on health care systems. (Locked) More »

Flu Vaccine Fact Sheet

These easy-to-read and understand fact sheets provide information to help readers choose to get a flu shot--especially important during the pandemic. Click here download the English and Spanish versions for free to use in your practice or business. More »

8 things you should know about pneumonia

Pneumonia is an infection that causes the air sacs in the lungs to fill up with fluid or pus, which makes it harder to breathe. The most common symptoms are cough that may be dry or produce phlegm, fever, chills and fatigue. Other symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and pain in the chest. and shortness of breath. Signs that indicate a more severe infection are shortness of breath, confusion, decreased urination and lightheadedness. In the U.S., pneumonia accounts for 1.3 visits to the Emergency Department, and 50,000 deaths annually.  With the COVID-19 pandemic continuing to affect people around the world, pneumonia has become an even larger health concern. Some people infected with the COVID-19 have no symptoms, while others may experience fever, body ache, dry cough, fatigue, chills, headache, sore throat, loss of appetite, and loss of smell. More »

Preventing the spread of the coronavirus

You've gotten the basics down: you're washing your hands regularly and keeping your distance from friends and family. But you likely still have questions. Are you washing your hands often enough? How exactly will social distancing help? What's okay to do while social distancing? And how can you strategically stock your pantry and medicine cabinet in order to minimize trips to the grocery store and pharmacy? The following actions help prevent the spread of COVID-19, as well as other coronaviruses and influenza: More »

Treatments for COVID-19

Most people who become ill with COVID-19 will be able to recover at home. Some of the same things you do to feel better if you have the flu — getting enough rest, staying well hydrated, and taking medications to relieve fever and aches and pains — also help with COVID-19. The antiviral drug remdesivir was FDA approved in October 2020 to treat certain hospitalized patients with COVID-19. And scientists are working hard to develop other effective treatments. Therapies that are under investigation include drugs that have been used to treat autoimmune diseases; additional antiviral drugs, and antibodies from people who have recovered from COVID-19. More »

COVID-19 basics

As we continually learn more about coronavirus and COVID-19, it can help to reacquaint yourself with some basic information. For example, understanding how the virus spreads reinforces the importance of social distancing and other health-promoting behaviors. Knowing how long the virus survives on surfaces can guide how you clean your home and handle deliveries. And reviewing the common symptoms of COVID-19 can help you know if it's time to self-isolate. Coronaviruses are an extremely common cause of colds and other upper respiratory infections. More »

If you are at higher risk

If you are at increased risk for serious illness from COVID-19, you need to be especially careful to avoid infection. You may have questions about your particular condition or treatment, how it impacts your risk of infection and illness, and what you need to do if you become ill. Your doctor is best equipped to provide individual advice, but we provide some general guidelines, below. The risk of serious illness from COVID-19 increases steadily with age, especially for those with underlying medical problems like chronic bronchitis, emphysema, cardiovascular disease, serious heart conditions, obesity, or diabetes. According to a recent study published in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, certain underlying medical conditions may increase the risk of serious COVID-19 for individuals of any age. More »