Put some pep in your step!

Interval walking is a form of interval training, which describes any form of exercise in which a person purposely speeds up and slows down at regular intervals throughout the session. Interval walking may improve endurance, reduce blood pressure, and help with weight loss. To introduce intervals into a well-established routine, include one or two segments of fast-paced walking in a 30-minute walk. Gradually add more intervals into the routine, with an ultimate goal of walking 50% of the time at the higher intensity. There’s flexibility in how that can be done—one minute on, one minute off, or two minutes on, two minutes off. More »

Whatever happened to CRISPR?

CRISPR technology enables a scientist to edit any piece of any DNA more easily and precisely than before. This may lead to treatments for disease. While no condition has yet been cured by CRISPR, doctors believe cures are coming. (Locked) More »

A quick-start guide to the latest food terminology

New terminology describing how foods are produced can be confusing, and doesn’t always indicate if a food is better for health. For example, non-GMO foods contain no genetically modified organisms (GMOs). But it’s heavily debated whether use of GMOs alters the nutritional quality of food or poses a threat to health. It’s helpful to learn the meaning of such terms such as non-GMO, grass-fed beef, free-range chickens, pasture-raised chickens, and wild-caught salmon. (Locked) More »

Is your diet interfering with your medication regimen?

Many foods, drinks, or ingredients in diet can undermine the effects of certain medications. For example, drinking alcohol can diminish the effects of erectile dysfunction drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra), or cause extreme drowsiness when taken with antihistamines. Eating foods high with lots of sodium or salt can nullify the effects of diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and ARBs. Eating black licorice while taking digoxin (Lanoxin) to treat heart failure may cause an irregular heartbeat and heart attack. When prescribed a new medicine, one should ask if diet will affect the drug. (Locked) More »

Can relationships boost longevity and well-being?

A Harvard study that’s lasted for eight decades suggests that maintaining meaningful relationships plays an important role in health, happiness, and longevity. The Harvard Study of Adult Development has collected health and wellness information from a group of men since they were teenagers in 1938. By following the men, researchers have found that people who are more socially connected to family, friends, and community are happier, healthier, and longer-lived than people who are less well connected. (Locked) More »

Easy ways to spot health scams

Untested remedies promising to treat or cure everything from arthritis to aging are considered health scams. Older adults are often vulnerable to them. Common scams include bogus dietary supplements and gadgets that promise to cure disease. The first tip-off to a health scam is advertising that uses terms such as quick fix, miracle, secret, cure, and breakthrough—or that promises to relieve medical problems. Before trying one of these products, one should check make sure it’s safe by checking with a doctor. (Locked) More »

Are you at risk for COPD?

COPD includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, severe asthma, or a combination of these conditions. They cause inflammation, destruction or abnormal repair of airways and lung tissue, which reduces airflow. Even though most cases of COPD are linked to smoking, about a fifth of all cases are linked to other causes, such as poorly controlled asthma, abnormal lung development, and air pollution. Treatment may involve inhaled medications to reduce inflammation and to open the airways, antibiotics, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation (exercise, education, and support), and surgical or nonsurgical procedures to improve lung function. More »